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National Academy of Education
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001
E-mail: info@naeducation.org

Members of the National Academy of Education

 

PRESIDENT:
Michael J. Feuer
, The George Washington University

PAST PRESIDENT:
Susan H. Fuhrman
, Teachers College, Columbia University

VICE PRESIDENT: 
James Pellegrino
, University of Illinois at Chicago

SECRETARY-TREASURER: 
Catherine Snow
, Harvard Graduate School of Education

MEMBERS: 
Bruce M. Alberts
, University of California, San Francisco 
Anthony Alvarado
, San Diego City Schools Education Center 
James D. Anderson
, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Richard C. Anderson
, University of Illinois 
Alexander W. Astin
, University of California, Los Angeles 
Richard C. Atkinson
, University of California  
Thomas Bailey
, Teachers College, Columbia University
Eva Baker
, University of California, Los Angeles
Deborah Loewenberg Ball
, University of Michigan
James A. Banks
, University of Washington
W. Steven Barnett
, National Institute for Early Education Research
Hyman Bass
, University of Michigan
Isabel Beck
, University of Pittsburgh
Gary S. Becker
, University of Chicago 
David C. Berliner
, Arizona State University  
Hilda Borko
, Stanford University
John Brademas
, New York University 
John D. Bransford
, University of Washington 
Jeanne Brooks-Gunn
, Teachers College and the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University
John Seely Brown
, Xerox Research Center   
Anthony S. Bryk
, The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
Eamonn Callan
, Stanford University 
Martin Carnoy
, Stanford University
Prudence Carter
, Stanford University
Michelene T.H. Chi
, Arizona State University
Paul Cobb
, Vanderbilt University 
Marilyn Cochran-Smith
, Boston College
David K. Cohen
, University of Michigan 
Michael Cole
, University of California, San Diego 
Allan Collins
, Northwestern University 
James P. Comer
, Yale University 
Lambros Comitas
, Teachers College, Columbia University 
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
, Claremont Graduate University 
William Damon
, Stanford University 
Linda Darling-Hammond
, Stanford University 
Andrea A. diSessa
, University of California, Berkeley 
Greg J. Duncan
, University of California, Irvine
Jacquelynne S. Eccles
, University of California, Irvine  
Ronald G. Ehrenberg
, Cornell University 
Margaret A. Eisenhart
, University of Colorado at Boulder 
Richard F. Elmore, Harvard Graduate School of Education 
Edgar Epps
, University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee
Frederick Erickson
,
 University of California, Los Angeles 
Michael J. Feuer
, The George Washington University 
Robert Floden
, Michigan State University
Susan Fuhrman
, Teachers College, Columbia University
Sarah Freedman
, University of California at Berkeley
Adam Gamoran
, William T. Grant Foundation 
Howard Gardner
, Harvard Graduate School of Education 
James Gee
, Arizona State University
Carol Gilligan
, New York University 
Herbert P. Ginsburg
, Teachers College, Columbia University
Gene V. Glass
, Arizona State University 
Susan R. Goldman
, University of Illinois at Chicago
Louis Gomez
, University of California at Los Angeles
Thomas L. Good
, University of Arizona
Edmund W. Gordon
, Yale University, and Teachers College, Columbia University
Patricia Albjerg Graham
, Harvard Graduate School of Education 
Hanna Holborn Gray
, University of Chicago 
Pamela Grossman
, Stanford University 
John T. Guthrie
, University of Maryland, College Park
Kris D. Gutiérrez
, University of Colorado at Boulder
Amy Gutmann
, University of Pennsylvania 
Edward H. Haertel
, Stanford University 
Kenji Hakuta
, Stanford University
Eric A. Hanushek
, Stanford University
Robert M. Hauser
, National Research Council  
Shirley Brice Heath
, Stanford University  
James J. Heckman
, University of Chicago
Larry V. Hedges
, Northwestern University
Jeffrey Henig
, Teachers College, Columbia University
George Hillocks
, University of Chicago 
Paul W. Holland
, NIEER
Jacqueline Jordan Irvine
, Emory University 
John F. (Jack) Jennings
, Center on Education Policy
Susan Moore Johnson
, Harvard Graduate School of Education 
Carl F. Kaestle
, Brown University 
Sharon Lynn Kagan
, Teachers College, Columbia University
Michael B. Katz
, University of Pennsylvania 
James A. Kelly
, Kelly Advisors, LLC 
Jeremy Kilpatrick
, University of Georgia
Walter Kintsch
, University of Colorado at Boulder 
Michael Kirst
, Stanford University 
David Klahr
, Carnegie Mellon University
Daniel M. Koretz
, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Helen F. Ladd
, Duke University
Gloria Ladson-Billings
, University of Wisconsin, Madison 
P. Lindsay Chase Lansdale
, Northwestern University 
Ellen Condliffe Lagemann
, Bard College 
Magdalene Lampert
, University of Michigan 
Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot
, Harvard Graduate School of Education 
Carol Lee, Northwestern University
Valerie Lee
, University of Michigan
Hope Jensen Leichter
, Teachers College, Columbia University 
Henry Levin
, Teachers College, Columbia University
Richard J. Light
, Harvard Graduate School of Education, John F. Kennedy School of Government 
Marcia Linn
, University of California, Berkeley
Robert L. Linn
, University of Colorado at Boulder 
Judith Warren Little
, University of California, Berkeley 
Susanna Loeb
, Stanford University 
Dan C. Lortie
, University of Chicago 
George F. Madaus
, Boston College 
Kathleen McCartney
, Smith College
Lorraine M. McDonnell
, University of California, Santa Barbara 
Milbrey W. McLaughlin
, Stanford University 
Michael McPherson
, Spencer Foundation 
Douglas Medin,
 Northwestern University
Hugh Mehan
, University of California, San Diego 
Deborah W. Meier
, New York University 
John W. Meyer
, Stanford University 
Jeffrey Mirel
, University of Michigan 
Robert Mislevy
, Educational Testing Service
Elizabeth Moje
, University of Michigan
Luis C. Moll
, University of Arizona 
Richard J. Murnane
, Harvard Graduate School of Education 
Anna Neumann
, Teachers College, Columbia University 
Nel Noddings
, Teachers College, Columbia University and Stanford University 
Pedro Noguera
, New York University
Jeannie Oakes
, Ford Foundation
Michael A. Olivas
, University of Houston 
Gary Orfield
, University of California, Los Angeles
Annemarie Palincsar
, University of Michigan
Roy Pea
, Stanford University 
P. David Pearson
, University of California, Berkeley 
James Pellegrino
, University of Illinois at Chicago
David N. Perkins
, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Paul E. Peterson
, Harvard University 
Penelope Peterson
, Northwestern University
Andrew C. Porter
, University of Pennsylvania 
Stephen W. Raudenbush
, University of Chicago  
Diane Ravitch
, New York University 
Sean Reardon
, Stanford University
William J. Reese
, University of Wisconsin, Madison 
Lauren B. Resnick
, University of Pittsburgh 
Barbara Rogoff
, University of California, Santa Cruz
Mike Rose
, UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies
Sheldon Rothblatt
, University of California, Berkeley
Cecilia E. Rouse
, Princeton University
Brian Rowan
, University of Michigan
Robert Rueda
, University of Southern California
Rubén G. Rumbaut
, University of California, Irvine
Geoffrey B. Saxe
, University of California, Berkeley 
Marlene Scardamalia
, University of Toronto, OISE
William H. Schmidt
, Michigan State University
Alan H. Schoenfeld
, University of California, Berkeley
Robert Schwartz
, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Donna E. Shalala
, University of Miami 
Lorrie A. Shepard
, University of Colorado at Boulder 
Lee S. Shulman
, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching 
Robert Siegler
, Carnegie Mellon University
Judith D. Singer
, Harvard Graduate School of Education 
Diana Slaughter
, University of Pennsylvania
Robert Slavin
, Johns Hopkins University 
Marshall S. Smith
, Visiting Scholar, Carnegie Foundation for Advancement of Teaching 
Catherine E. Snow
, Harvard Graduate School of Education  
Margaret Beale Spencer
, University of Chicago
James Spillane
, Northwestern University
Claude M. Steele
, Columbia University 
Robert J. Sternberg
 
James W. Stigler
, University of California, Los Angeles 
Deborah J. Stipek
, Stanford University 
Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, University of California, Los Angeles 
David S. Tatel
, United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit 
William Tierney
, University of Southern California
Judith Torney-Purta
, University of Maryland at College Park
Guadalupe Valdés
, Stanford University 
Deborah Vandell
, University of California at Irvine
Maris Vinovskis
, University of Michigan  
Lois Weis
, University of Buffalo
Roger P. Weissberg
, The University of Illinois at Chicago
Amy Stuart Wells
, Teachers College, Columbia University
Clifton R. Wharton Jr., TIAA-CREF 
Carl E. Wieman
, Stanford University
Bernard Weiner
, University of California, Los Angeles 
John B. Willett
, Harvard Graduate School of Education 
Mark Wilson
, University of California, Berkeley 
William Julius Wilson
, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government 
Suzanne Wilson
, Michigan State University
Hiro Yoshikawa
, New York University
Ken Zeichner
, University of Washington, Seattle 

 

 

MEMBERS EMERITI: 
Bernard Bailyn
Carl Bereiter

Charles E. Bidwell

Derek Bok

Jerome S. Bruner

Courtney Cazden
 
K. Patricia Cross
 
Larry Cuban
 
Robert Dreeben
 
Elizabeth Fennema
 
David Pierpont Gardner

Nathan Glazer
 
John I. Goodlad
 
Maxine Greene

James G. Greeno

Jurgen Herbst
 
Father Theodore M. Hesburgh
 
Philip W. Jackson

H. Thomas James

Judith E. Lanier

Marvin Lazerson

Robert A. LeVine

James G. March
 
Wilbert J. McKeachie

Robert Moses

Harold J. Noah
 
Frederick Olafson

Ingram Olkin

Denis C. Phillips

Thomas A. Romberg

Richard J. Shavelson 
George Spindler
 
Kenneth Strike

Patrick Suppes
 
David Tyack

Finis Welch
 

FOREIGN ASSOCIATES: 
Hiroshi Azuma
, Shirayuri College, Japan 
Miriam Ben-Peretz
, University of Haifa
Kieran Egan
, Simon Fraser University 
Michael Fullan
, University of Toronto, OISE 
Guy Neave, International Association of Universities, France 
David R. Olson
, University of Toronto, OISE
Fritz Oser
, Lehrstuhl fur Padagogik und Padagogische Psychologie 
Michael Rutter
, Institute of Psychiatry, England
Gavriel Salomon
, University of Haifa
Manabu Sato
, Gakushuin University, Japan
Sidney Strauss
, Tel Aviv University
John Willinsky
, Stanford University
J. Douglas Willms
, University of New Brunswick

FOREIGN ASSOCIATES EMERITI: 
Paul Black

Erik De Corte
A. H. Halsey 
John F. C. Harrison
 

Members Biographical Information

Bruce M. Alberts a prominent biochemist with a strong commitment to the improvement of science education, serves as Editor-in-Chief of Science, and as one of three US Science Envoys. Alberts is also Professor Emeritus in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of California, San Francisco, to which he returned in 2005 after serving two six-year terms as the president of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. During his tenure at the NAS, Alberts was instrumental in developing the landmark National Science Education standards that promote science as inquiry” teaching. Alberts is also noted as one of the original authors of The Molecular Biology of the Cell, a pre-eminent textbook in the field now in its fifth edition. Alberts has earned many honors and awards, including 16 honorary degrees. He currently serves on the advisory boards of more than 25 non-profit institutions, including the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Anthony Alvarado Professor of Education, Stanford University, is former chancellor of instruction of San Diego City Schools. He received his BA and MA from Fordham University. He is the former superintendent of District 2 in New York City, where he instituted a professional development program for teachers and principals. He has received the Dana Award for Pioneering Achievement in Education. 

James D. Anderson is the author of The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935 which received the Outstanding Book Award of the American Educational Research Association. Anderson is also co-editor of New Perspectives on Black Educational Historyand has published numerous articles and book chapters on the history of education. He has served as expert witness in a series of federal desegregation cases, including, Liddell v. Missouri; Jenkins v. Missouri; Knight v. Alabama; Ayers v. Mississippi; and the recent University of Michigan affirmative action case, Gratz v. Michigan. His most current work includes a publication in press entitled No Sacrifice Too Great: The History of African American Education from Slavery to the Twenty-First Century. Anderson earned a bachelor’s degree (1966) from Stillman College and both a master’s degree (1969) and doctorate (1973) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was named a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study and Behavioral Science at Stanford University and recently received the Distinguished Career Contributions Award from the American Educational Research Association’s Committee on Scholars of Color in Education. He served as advisor to and participant in the PBS documentaries School: The Story of American Public Education” (2001), The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow” (2002), and Forgotten Genius: The Percy Julian Story” (2007). He is the Senior Editor of the History of Education Quarterly.www.ed.uiuc.edu/eps/frp/janders

Richard C. Anderson is University Scholar and professor emeritus of education and psychology at the University of Illinois. He is also professor at Beijing Normal University and president of China Children’s Books. Educated at Harvard, Anderson has been a school teacher and an assistant superintendent of schools. He has served as president of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and chaired the National Academy of Education–National Institute of Education Commission on Reading. He has published more than two hundred books and articles, notably Becoming a Nation of Readers. Anderson's honors include twice winning the Palmer O. Johnson Award, AERA's annual award for an outstanding educational research paper; the Oscar O. Causey Award from the National Reading Conference for career-long excellence in reading research; the William S. Gray Citation of Merit, the highest honor of the International Reading Association; the Distinguished Contribution to Educational Research Award of AERA; and the Edward Lee Thorndike Award for distinguished psychological contributions to education, presented by the American Psychological Association. He is currently the featured honoree in the Gallery of Scientists of the Federation of Associations of Brain and Behavioral Sciences. Anderson is interested in children's reading, including microanalysis of social and cognitive facets of classroom reading lessons, story discussions that promote thinking, and the influence of writing systems on learning to read.

Alexander W. Astin is Allan M. Cartter Professor of Higher Education Emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles. Astin has received the Award for Outstanding Research and the Extended Research Award from the American Association for Counseling and Development, the E. F. Lindquist Award from the American Educational Research Association, and the Research Achievement Award, The Mentoring Award, and the Howard R. Bowen Distinguished Career Award from the Association for the Study of Higher Education. His publications include Four Critical Years, Minorities in American Higher Education, Assessment for ExcellenceWhat Matters in College?, Mindworks, andCultivating the Spirit. He has been a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and is the recipient of 11 honorary degrees.

Richard C. Atkinson served from 1995-2003 as the seventeenth president of the University of California (UC) system. His eight-year tenure was marked by innovative approaches to admissions and outreach, research initiatives to accelerate the university’s contributions to the state’s economy, and a challenge to the country’s most widely used admissions examination—the SAT 1—that led to major changes in the way millions of America’s youth are tested for college admissions. Before becoming president of the UC system, Atkinson served for fifteen years as chancellor of UC San Diego, where he led that campus’ emergence as one of the leading research universities in the nation. He is a former director of the National Science Foundation and past president of the American Association of American Universities, and he was a long-term member of the faculty at Stanford University. His research in the field of cognitive science and psychology has been concerned with problems of memory and cognition. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Education, and the American Philosophical Society, and a mountain in Antarctica has been named in his honor. 
http://www.rca.ucsd.edu

Thomas Bailey is the George and Abby O'Neill Professor of Economics and Education in the Department of Education Policy and Social Analysis (EPSA) at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is an economist, with specialties in education, labor economics, and econometrics. He is also Director of the Community College Research Center (CCRC) and of two national Centers, the National Center for Postsecondary Research (NCPR), established in 2006, and the National Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment (CAPSEE), established in 2011. Both national centers are funded by grants from the Institute for Education Sciences. In June 2010, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan appointed him chair of the Committee on Measures of Student Success, which developed recommendations for community colleges to comply with completion rate disclosure requirements under the Higher Education Opportunity Act. Bailey has also served as a consultant to many public agencies and foundations as well as several state and local economic development and educational agencies. Bailey established the Community College Research Center (CCRC) at Teachers College in 1996, with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and since 1992 has been Director of the Institute on Education and the Economy (IEE) at Teachers College. His articles have appeared in a wide variety of education, policy-oriented and academic journals, and he authored or co-authored several books on the employment and training of immigrants and the extent and effects of on-the-job training. His most recent book, co-edited with Vanessa Morest, is Defending the Community College Equity Agenda (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006). Other books include Working Knowledge: Work-Based Learning and Education Reform(Routledge, 2004), co-authored with Katherine Hughes and David Moore; Manufacturing Advantage (Cornell University Press, 2000), written with Eileen Appelbaum, Peter Berg, and Arne Kalleberg; and The Double Helix of Education and the Economy (IEE, 1992), co-authored with Sue Berryman. Dr. Bailey holds a PhD in labor economics from MIT.  http://www.tc.columbia.edu/academics/?facid=tb3

Eva L. Baker is Distinguished Professor of Education at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. She has directed the UCLA Center for the Study of Evaluation (CSE) since 1975. She is also Director of the Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST), a competitively awarded national institution funded by the U.S. Department of Education and supported by other government agencies and private organizations.   Former president of the Educational Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association and the American Educational Research Association, Dr. Baker was also the 2006-2007 president of the American Educational Research Association and a former editor of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. She was co-chair of the committee to revise the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing (1999), was a member of the Advisory Council on Education Statistics (ACES) for the National Center for Education Statistics, and chair of the Board on Testing and Assessment of the National Research Council. Dr. Baker's research is focused on the integration of research on learning and measurement. She also conducts studies in accountability. She is presently involved in the design of technologically sophisticated testing and evaluation systems of performance assessment in large-scale environments for both military and civilian education.

Deborah Loewenberg Ball is the William H. Payne Collegiate Professor in education at the University of Michigan, and an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, and is a research professor at the Institute for Social Research. She currently serves as dean of the School of Education and as director of TeachingWorks. She taught elementary school for over 15 years, and continues to teach mathematics to elementary students every summer. Her research focuses on the practice of teaching and teacher education, and on the improvement of teacher training and development, with a focus on mathematics instruction. Ball has authored or co-authored over 150 publications and has lectured and made numerous major presentations around the world. Her research has been recognized with several awards and honors, and she has served on several national and international commissions and panels focused on policy initiatives and the improvement of education. She is a member of the National Science Board, a trustee of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, and chairs the Spencer Foundation Board of Directors. Ball is an elected member of the National Academy of Education. She earned her bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees at Michigan State University.
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dball/

James A. Banks is Kerry and Linda Killinger Endowed Chair in Diversity Studies and founding director of the Center for Multicultural Education at the University of Washington, Seattle. He received a BE in social science education from Chicago State University and a MA and a PhD in social science and education from Michigan State University. Banks is a leader in the fields of social studies education and multicultural education. His publications include Cultural Diversity and Education: Foundations, Curriculum, and Teaching (Fifth Edition); Educating Citizens in a Multicultural Society (Second Edition); Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education; Race, Culture, and Education: The Selected Works of James A. Banks; The Routledge International Companion to Multicultural Education; and the Encyclopedia of Diversity in Education (4 Volumes), published by Sage. Banks is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies and of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). He received the AERA Research Review Award in 1997, the AERA Social Justice Award in 2004, and the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Inc. President's Award in 1998. He has honorary degrees from the Bank Street College of Education, the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, the University of Wisconsin, Parkside, DePaul University, Lewis and Clark College, and Grinnell College. Banks received the Distinguished Career Research in Social Studies Award from the National Council for the Social Studies in 2001, the UCLA Medal in 2005, and a Distinguished Alumni Award from Michigan State University in 2005. He was a Spencer Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford in 2005-2006. Professor Banks was the Tisch Distinguished Visiting Professor at Teachers College, Columbia University in 2007.
http://faculty.washington.edu/jbanks

W. Steven Barnett is an economist and educational researcher whose work focuses on the economics of child development and related public policies, particularly early education policy.  He is the Board of Governors Professor of Education (Economics and Policy) in the Graduate School of Education at Rutgers University, and Founding Co-Director of the National Institute of Early Education Research (NIEER) at Rutgers.  Dr. Barnett earned his Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Michigan.  His 1984 benefit-cost analysis of the Perry Preschool program placed preschool investments into the framework of social investment in which preschool education and other early interventions are evaluated based on their returns to society and are not simply viewed as a public expense.   More recent studies have focused on measuring the costs and benefits of full-day educational child care, meta-analysis of early childhood interventions in the United States and internationally, and evaluating the impacts of preschool programs including those designed for such specific purposes as enhancing bilingualism and executive function.

Hyman Bass is the Samuel Eilenberg Distinguished University Professor of Mathematics and Mathematics Education at the University of Michigan. Prior to 1999 he was Adrain Professor of Mathematics at Columbia University. His mathematical research covers broad areas of algebra with connections to geometry, topology and number theory. He has received the Cole Prize for his work in algebraic K-theory from the American Mathematical Society, of which he was later president. In 2007 he received the US National Medal of Science. He has held visiting research and faculty positions at mathematical centers around the world, including Paris, Bombay, Rio, Cambridge, Stockholm, Mexico, Rome, Trieste, Hong Kong, Berkeley, and Jerusalem. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Third World Academy of Sciences. Bass was chair of the Mathematical Sciences Education Board at the NRC, and President of the International Commission on Mathematics Instruction. For more than a decade he has been collaborating with Deborah Ball and her research groups at the University of Michigan on aspects of mathematical knowledge for the teaching of mathematics, mainly at the elementary level. In particular, he has explored how the concepts and practices of mathematics as a discipline can find authentic, and pedagogically appropriate expression in school classrooms. In all of this work, a major challenge has been to build bridges between diverse professional communities, especially mathematicians, and stakeholders involved in mathematics education.

Isabel Beck is professor emerita at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Beck has conducted extensive research on decoding, vocabulary, and comprehension, and has published many journal articles and several books on these topics. Dr. Beck’s work has been acknowledged by numerous awards, including the Oscar S. Causey award for outstanding research from the National Reading Conference, and the William S. Gray award for career contributions to the field from the International Reading Association.  She is also the recipient of the Contributing Researcher Award from the American Federation of Teachers for "bridging the gap between research and practice,” which is Dr. Beck’s hallmark. Most recently she was elected to the National Academy of Education.

Gary Becker is a professor of economics and sociology at the University of Chicago. He received his AB from Princeton University and his AM and PhD from the University of Chicago. Becker has received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, the John Bates Clark Medal from the American Economic Association, the Professional Achievement Award from the University of Chicago, and the W. S. Woytinsky Award from the University of Michigan. His publications include Human CapitalEconomic Theory, The Allocation of Time and Goods Over the Life Cycle, and Social Economics.

David C. Berliner is Regents' Professor Emeritus at Arizona State University. His research and scholarship focus on teaching, teacher education, and educational policy. He is co-author (with Bruce Biddle) of The Manufactured Crisis, which won the Outstanding Book Award of the American Educational Research Association; co-editor (with Robert Calfee) of the Handbook of Educational Psychology; co-author (with Sharon Nichols) of Collateral Damage: How High-stakes Testing Corrupts America’s Schools; and co-author (with Nathaniel Gage) of six editions of Educational Psychology. He has received the Edward Lee Thorndike Award for Distinguished Psychological Contributions to Education and the American Educational Research Association's (AERA) highest honor, the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Educational Research. He has been president of both AERA and the American Psychological Association's Division of Educational Psychology. He is a member, as well, of the International Academy of Education and a fellow of the National Center for Educational Policy at Boulder, CO.
http://education.asu.edu/faculty/view/david-berliner

Hilda Borko is a professor of education at Stanford University. She received her BA in psychology, her MA in philosophy education, and her PhD in educational psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Borko’s research explores teacher cognition and the process of learning to teach, with an emphasis on changes in novice and experienced teachers’ knowledge and beliefs about teaching, learning, and assessment; classroom practices; and professional identities as they participate in reform-based teacher education and professional development programs. Her teaching interests are in the related areas of classroom processes, teaching for understanding, and learning to teach. Borko is a member of numerous professional organizations in education and psychology and has served as a member and chair of various committees for the American Educational Research Association, Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators, and Educational Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association. She was editor of the teaching, learning, and human development section of the American Educational Research Journal, interim editor (with Lorrie Shepard) of Educational Researcher, and editor of Journal of Teacher Education (with Jennie Whitcomb and Dan Liston). She served as President of the American Educational Research Association (2003-2004). She received the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics award for the outstanding article published in the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education in 1992.

John Brademas is President emeritus of New York University (NYU) and was NYU president from 1981 to 1992. He received his BA from Harvard and PhD from Oxford University. A member of Congress (1959–1981) and House Majority Whip, he authored major legislation to support education, the arts and humanities, libraries, and museums. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Academy of Athens, European Academy of Sciences and Arts, and National Academy of Education of Argentina, Brademas has received honorary degrees from fifty-five colleges and universities. He is President of the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center of New York University Foundation and founder and Chairman of the Advisory Council of the John Brademas Center for the Study of Congress at NYU. His books include The Politics of Education: Conflict and Consensus on Capitol Hill and Washington, DC to Washington Square.

John Bransford holds the James W. Mifflin University Professorship and is professor of education at the University of Washington. He was formerly Centennial Professor of Psychology and Education and co-director of the Learning Technology Center at Vanderbilt University. He received his BA from Hamline University and his PhD from the University of Minnesota. His more than two hundred publications include Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, How People Learn: Bridging Research and Practice, and How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School

Jeanne Brooks-Gunn is the Virginia and Leonard Marx Professor of Child Development at Teachers College and the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. A developmental psychologist, she obtained her B.A. from Connecticut College, Ed.M. from Harvard University and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Brooks-Gunn specializes in policy-oriented research that focuses on family and community influences on the development of children and youth. Her research centers on designing and evaluating interventions and policies aimed at enhancing the well-being of children, with a particular focus on children whose parents are poor, are single or have low levels of education. She also examines the interaction of development, biology and environment. She conducts multi-site longitudinal studies and coordinates experiments which explore the role of housing, as well as early childhood, afterschool, and home visiting programs in the development of children. Her books include Adolescent mothers in later life (1987), Consequences of growing up poor(1997) and Neighborhood Poverty: Context and consequences for children (Volume 1). Policy implications in studying neighborhoods (Volume 2) (1997). Professor Brooks-Gunn has received numerous honors and awards for her work. Her awards and recognitions include: election into the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (2009); Honorary Doctorate of Science at Northwestern University (2009); the Society for Research in Child Development’s award for distinguished contributions to public policy for children (2005). She has been elected an American Educational Research Association Fellow (2010); Margaret Mead Fellow by the American Academy of Political and Social Science (2004) and has received the James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award (2002) for outstanding contributions to the area of applied psychological research from the American Psychological Association. She was honored with the Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy Award (2001) from the American Psychological Association and has also received the John B. Hill Awardfrom the Society for Research on Adolescence for her life-time contribution to research on adolescence (1996).

John Seely Brown is the former chief scientist of Xerox Corporation. He received his BA from Brown University and his MS and PhD from the University of Michigan. With Paul Duguid he co-authored the acclaimed book The Social Life of Information (HBS Press, 2000) that has been translated into nine languages with a second addition in April 2002. He is currently a visiting scholar at the Annenberg Center at the University of Southern California. 
http://www.johnseelybrown.com

Anthony Bryk is the ninth president of The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. He held the Spencer Chair in Organizational Studies in the School of Education and the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University from 2004 until assuming Carnegie’s presidency in September 2008. He came to Stanford from the University of Chicago where he was the Marshall Field IV Professor of Urban Education in the sociology department, and where he helped found the Center for Urban School Improvement, which supports reform efforts in the Chicago Public Schools. He also created the Consortium on Chicago School Research, a federation of research groups that have produced a range of studies to advance and assess urban school reform. His current research and practice interests focus on the organizational redesign of schools and school systems and the integration of technology into schooling to enhance teaching and learning. Dr. Bryk received his BS from Boston College and his EdD from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Bryk has received the Palmer A. Johnson Award, the American Educational Research Association Division H Research Utilization Award, and the Willard Waller Award from the American Sociological Association. His books include Hierarchical Linear Models (with Stephen Raudenbush), Catholic Schools and the Common Good (with Valerie Lee and Peter Holland), Chartering Chicago School Reform: Democratic Localism as a Lever for Change(with Penny Bender Sebring et al.), and Trust in Schools (with Barbara Schneider), andOrganizing Schools for Improvement; Lessons from Chicago with Penny Bender Sebring, Elaine Allensworth, Stuart Luppescu, and John Q. Easton.

Eamonn Callan is Pigott Family Professor in the Stanford University School of Education.He is a philosopher of education whose work draws heavily on contemporary moral and political theory. His principal interests are in civic and moral education and in the application of theories of justice and democracy to problems in educational policy and practice.  He received his undergraduate and masters degrees from the National University of Ireland and his doctorate in the philosophy of education from the University of Alberta. His many publications include Creating Citizens: Political Education and Liberal Democracy and Autonomy and Schooling. http://ed.stanford.edu/faculty/ecallan

Prudence Carter  is Professor of Education and (by courtesy) Sociology at Stanford University where she teaches a range of courses on racial and ethnic relations, social and cultural inequality, the sociology of education, and research methods. She is also the Faculty Director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities and formerly the co-director, along with Dr. Linda-Darling Hammond, of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE). Prior to joining the Stanford faculty in 2007, Dr. Carter was Associate Professor of Sociology at Harvard University and a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow with the Program on Poverty, the Underclass and Public Policy and the Program for Research on Black Americans at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

A native Mississippian, Dr. Carter is a product of public schools in Clarksdale and Jackson. She graduated from Brown University with a Bachelor of Science degree in applied mathematics and economics, earned an M.A. in Sociology and Education from Columbia University, Teachers College , and an M. Phil. and PhD in Sociology from Columbia University. Dr. Carter is the author of two books, the award winning Keepin’ It Real: School Success beyond Black and White and Stubborn Roots: Race, Culture, and Inequality in U.S. and South African Schools, and co-editor (along with Dr. Kevin Welner) of Closing the Opportunity Gap: What America Must Do to Give All Children an Even Chance, all published by Oxford University Press. Dr. Carter has also published numerous articles, book chapters, and essays.
http://ed.stanford.edu/faculty/plcarter

Michelene T. H. Chi is the director of the Learning Sciences Institute and a foundation professor in the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College Arizona State University. She is a cognitive science researcher interested in issues of how students learn. Her early research investigated the role of knowledge in children’s competence as well as in differences in the representations between adult novices and experts. She discovered an important phenomenon that self-explaining increases learning more than receiving explanations, and pioneered a method of analyzing verbal explanations that is both quantitative and qualitative. She has done seminal studies on many other learning methods, include learning from being tutored, from collaborating, and from observing and overhearing tutorial dialogues. Another area of her research focuses on the origin of scientific misconceptions and she has explored approaches to teaching emergent, robustly misconceived processes. Recently she introduced a framework that defines active learning by differentiating students’ learning activities as passive, active, constructive or interactive, and compares their relative effectiveness. She has over 100 publications and 25 of them have over 200 citations each. Two have been ranked the first and seventh most highly cited articles published in the journal Cognitive Science.

Paul Cobb is Professor of Mathematics Education at Vanderbilt University, where he holds the Peabody Chair in Teaching and Learning. His research interests focus on instructional design, issues of equity in mathematics teaching and learning, and the improving mathematics teaching on a larger scale. He received Hans Freudenthal Medal for cumulative research program over the prior ten years from the International Commission on Mathematics Instruction (ICMI) in 2005, and the Silver Scribner Award from American Educational Research Association in 2010 for research over the past ten years that contributes to our understanding of learning and instruction. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Education and is an Invited Fellow of the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. He received the award for outstanding article published in the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education in1996. A book edited by Erna Yackel, Koeno Gravemeijer, and Anna Sfard that describes the evolution of his research program was published in 2010: A Journey in Mathematics Education Research: Insights from the Research of Paul Cobb. http://peabody.vanderbilt.edu/bio/paul-cobb

Marilyn Cochran-Smith is the Cawthorne Professor of Education and Director of the Doctoral Program in Curriculum and Instruction at the Lynch School of Education, Boston College. Cochran-Smith is a past president of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and was co-chair of AERA's National Panel on Research and Teacher Education and co-editor of their report, Studying Teacher Education (2005). Cochran-Smith was also editor of the Journal of Teacher Education, 2000-2006, and is co-editor of the Teachers College Press series on Practitioner Inquiry, which includes more than three dozen books by practitioners and/or about practitioner research, including Inquiry as Stance: Practitioner Research for the Next Generation (with Susan L. Lytle, 2009). Cochran-Smith received AERA’s 2006 Research to Practice Award for her book, Policy, Practice and Politics in Teacher Education. She has also received numerous AACTE awards, including the Pomeroy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Teacher Education, the Margaret Lindsey Award for Distinguished Research in Teacher Education, and the Research and Writing Award in both 1995 and 2005. Dr. Cochran-Smith is a frequent keynote speaker nationally and internationally. In 2006, she served as the inaugural C.J. Koh Endowed Professor at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. Cochran-Smith has written more than 150 many articles, chapters, editorials, and books on social justice, practitioner research, and teacher education research, practice and policy. http://www.bc.edu/content/bc/schools/lsoe/facultystaff/faculty/cochran-smith.html

David Cohen is John Dewey Collegiate Professor of Education and professor of public policy at the University of Michigan. His current research interests include the relations between policy and instruction, the nature of teaching practice, and the effects of school improvement interventions. His past work has included studies of various efforts to reform schools and teaching, the evaluation of educational experiments and large-scale intervention programs, and the relations between research and policy. Cohen's publications include Usable Knowledge: Social Science and Social Problem Solving (with Charles Lindblom) and The Shopping Mall High School: Winners and Losers in the Educational Marketplace (with Arthur Powell and Eleanor Farrar). 

Michael Cole is University Professor of Communication, Psychology, and Human Development and director of the Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition at the University of California, San Diego. He received his BA from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his PhD from Indiana University. He conducted postdoctoral research with Alexander Luria at Moscow State University. His subsequent research has focused on the role of culture in human development with a special emphasis on the role of education as a sociocultural institution. Cole is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Russian Academy of Education. In recent years his research has focused on learning and development in specially designed idiocultures implemented in community settings after school. His publications include Cultural Psychology: A Once and Future Discipline, The Psychology of Literacy (with Sylvia Scribner), and The Development of Children (with Sheila Cole).  
http://LCHC.ucsd.edu/People/MCole/colevita.pdf

Allan Collins is professor emeritus of education and social policy at Northwestern University. He received his BA, MA, and PhD from the University of Michigan. His research in education centers on design research, learning communities, epistemic forms and games, cognitive apprenticeship, situated learning, and systemic validity in assessment.  He has received a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship and a Sloan Foundation fellowship. His publications include Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology (with Richard Halverson), The Cognitive Structure of Emotions (with Andrew Ortony and Gerald Clore), Readings in Cognitive Science (edited with Edward Smith), and Cognitive Apprenticeship: Teaching the Crafts of Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic (with John Seely Brown and S.E. Newman). http://www.sesp.northwestern.edu/profile/?p=52

James P. Comer is Maurice Falk Professor of Child Psychiatry at Yale University and associate dean at the Yale School of Medicine. He received his AB from Indiana University, his MD from Howard University’s College of Medicine, and his MPH from University of Michigan. Between 1964 and 1967, he trained in psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine and its Child Study Center. He also completed one year of residency training at the Hillcrest Children's Center in Washington, DC. Comer has received the Heinz Award for the Human Condition, the Healthtrac Foundation Prize, and the Harold W. McGraw Jr. Prize in Education. His publications include Beyond Black and WhiteBlack Child CareMaggie’s American DreamSchool Power, and Waiting for a Miracle: Why Schools Can’t Solve Our Problems and How We Can
http://www.schooldevelopmentprogram.org

Lambros Comitas is Gardner Cowles Professor of Anthropology and Education at Teachers College (TC), Columbia University and director of TC's Institute of International Studies. He was, for many years, the director of the Research Institute for the Study of Man in New York City, a leading American center of Caribbean study. At Teachers College he directed the Division of Philosophy, the Social Sciences, and Education and, at Columbia proper, the Institute of Latin American and Iberian Studies. An authority on the scholarly literature of the Caribbean, Comitas has carried out anthropological field research in Barbados, Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, Bolivia, Greece, the Soviet Union, Andorra, and Spain with particular focus on fishing populations, social organization, education, drugs and society, and change. Among his publications are The Complete Caribbeana 1900-1975: A Bibliographic Guide to the Scholarly Literature, Ganja in Jamaica (with Vera Rubin), West Indian Perspectives (with D. Lowenthal), Report and Working Papers on Anthropology and Education, andInterdisciplinary Research and Doctoral Training: A Study of the Linkoping University (Sweden) Tema Departments (with T.C. Brock, B. Sigurd, and A.O.P. Sundborg). Elected to the National Academy of Education in 1979, Comitas has served as president of the Society for Applied Anthropology.

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is the C.S. and D.J. Davidson professor of psychology and management at the Claremont Graduate University in California. He received his BA and PhD from the University of Chicago, where he taught for 30 years and chaired the Department of Psychology. Csikszentmihalyi has received numerous grants for his research on the quality of experience in daily lives, creative thinking, and adolescence across cultures. His publications include Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, which has been translated in 23 languages; Talented Teenagers (with Kevin Rathunde and Samuel Whalen); The Evolving Self: A Psychology for the Third Millennium; Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention; and Good BusinessFlow, Leadership and the Making of Meaning.He is the recipient of several honorary degrees and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, among others.

William Damon is professor of education at Stanford University and one of the world’s leading scholars of human, social, and moral development. By focusing his work on the positive aspects of growing up” rather than on the severe behavioral problems of adolescents, Damon has put himself on the forefront of the emerging positive psychology movement in the United States. His current research explores how people develop character and a sense of purpose in their work, family, and community relationships. He examines how young people can approach their careers with a focus on purpose, imagination, and high standards of excellence. He also has written widely about how to educate for ethical understanding. Damon’s most recent books are: The Path to Purpose: How Young People Find Their Calling in Life (2008); Taking Philanthropy Seriously: Beyond Noble Intentions to Responsible Giving(2006, with Susan Verducci); The Moral Advantage: How to succeed in business by doing the right thing (2004); and Noble Purpose: The joy of living a meaningful life (2003). His earlier books include: Bringing in a New Era in Character Education (2002); Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet (2001, with Howard Gardner and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi); The Youth Charter (1997); Greater Expectations: Overcoming the Culture of Indulgence in Our Homes and Schools (1995); Some Do Care: Contemporary Lives of Moral Commitment (1992, with Anne Colby); and The Moral Child (1990). As a developmental psychologist, he has made important contributions to education, establishing after-school programs in Boston, unifying communities in educating youth, and working with journalists. Damon has received awards from several major foundations and the Parent’s Choice Book Award. He is currently the director of the Stanford Center on Adolescence. http://coa.stanford.edu

Linda Darling-Hammond is Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University where her research, teaching, and policy work focus on issues of school reform, educational equity, and teaching quality. She received her BA, magna cum laude, from Yale University and her EdD from Temple University, with highest distinction, completing an award-winning dissertation on school finance reform.  Darling-Hammond has been a member of the Academy for more than 15 years and is a past president of the American Educational Research Association (AERA).  She has received numerous honorary degrees and awards for her research and contributions to practice, including the Margaret B. Lindsey Award for Distinguished Research in Teacher Education, the Distinguished Service Award of the Council of Chief State School Officers, and both the Review of Research in Education Award and the Research into Practice Award from AERA. Her publications include The Right to Learn, which received the 1998 Outstanding Book Award from AERA, and Teaching as the Learning Profession, which received the 2000 Outstanding Book Award from the National Staff Development Council. With John Bransford, Darling-Hammond co-chaired the National Academy of Education’s Committee on Teacher Education, which produced Preparing Teachers for a Changing World, which received the Pomeroy Award from the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education.

Andrea diSessa is Evelyn Lois Corey Professor of Cognition and Development at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his AB in physics from Princeton University and his PhD, also in physics, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on conceptual change, particularly the nature and role of intuitive knowledge, and on transformative possibilities of technology use in education. diSessa was twice a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and received the Australian Council for Education Research/Australian Telecom Sunrise Fellowship. His publications include Turtle Geometry: The Computer as a Medium for Exploring Mathematics (with Harold Abelson),Toward an Epistemology of Physics (Cognition and Instruction monograph), Computers and Exploratory Learning (with Celia Hoyles and Richard Noss), and Changing Minds: Computers, Learning, and Literacy. He has been active as an editor, executive editor, and on the editorial boards of a number of journals, including currently serving as editor-in-chief of Cognition and Instruction. http://gse.berkeley.edu/people/andrea-disessa

Greg Duncan is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Education at the University of California, Irvine. With a 1974 Ph.D. in Economics, Duncan spent the first two decades of his career at the University of Michigan working on, and ultimately directing, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) data collection project, which, in 2001, was named by the National Science Foundation to be one of the 50 most significant NSF-funded projects in the organization’s history. Beginning in the late 1980s, Duncan engaged in a number of interdisciplinary research networks and began to focus on the impacts of family and neighborhood conditions on children’s cognitive and behavioral development. During his 1995-2008 tenure at Northwestern University, he was the Edwina S. Tarry Professor in the School of Education and Social Policy. He co-edited Neighborhood Poverty (1997), Consequences of Growing Up Poor (1997) and For Better and for Worse: Welfare Reform and the Well-Being of Children and Families (2001) and coauthored Higher Ground: New Hope for the Working Poor and Their Children (2007). Duncan was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001 and the National Academy of Sciences in 2010. He was President of the Midwest Economics Association in 2004, the Population Association of America in 2008 and the Society for Research in Child Development (2009-11). http://www.gse.uci.edu

Jacquelynne Eccles is Wilbert McKeachie Collegiate Professor of Psychology, at the University of Michigan. She received her BA from the University of California, Berkeley, and her PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles. Eccles has received the APS James McKeen Cattell Award, Society for Research on Adolescence Hill Award from the, the Div. 15 APAThorndyke Award, and the Div. 9 APA Kurt Lewin Award. She is past president of the Society for Research on Adolescence and one of the founders of the AERA Motivation SIG. Among other publications, she is co-author or co-editor of Managing to Make It, Gender and Occupational Outcomes, and Unexpected Educational Pathways. Her research focuses on school, family, and peer groups as contexts for social and cognitive development. 
http://www.rcgd.isr.umich.edu/garp/

Ronald G. Ehrenberg is Irving M. Ives Professor of Industrial and Labor Relations and Economics at Cornell University, director of the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute, and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. From 1995 to 1998, he served as Cornell’s vice president for Academic Programs, Planning, and Budget. He received a BA in mathematics from Harpur College (State University of New York, Binghamton) in 1966, a PhD in economics from Northwestern University in 1970, an Honorary Doctorate of Science from the State University of New York in 2008, and an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Pennsylvania State University in 2011. He is a noted labor economist, past president and a fellow of the Society of Labor Economics, and co-author of the leading textbook, Modern Labor Economics: Theory and Public Policy (tenth edition). His research over the last two decades has focused on higher education issues. Ehrenberg is the editor of American University: National Treasure or Endangered SpeciesGoverning Academia, Science and the University, What’s Happening to Public Higher Education,Doctoral Education, and The Faculty of the Future, and the author of Tuition Rising: Why College Costs So Much and Educating Scholars: Doctoral Education in the Humanities. In 2002, he was named a national associate of the National Academies and in 2005 he was named a Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellow at Cornell University; the highest honor that Cornell gives for undergraduate teaching. He currently serves on the National Research Council’s committees on Measuring Productivity in Higher Education and on Research Universities. From 2006 to 2010 he served as a trustee of Cornell University and he currently serves as trustee of the State University of New York.
http://faculty.cit.cornell.edu/rge2
http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/cheri

Margaret A. Eisenhart is University Distinguished Professor and Charles Professor of Educational Anthropology and Research Methodology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She received her undergraduate degree in French literature from Emory University and her masters and doctorate degrees in anthropology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on the application of anthropological concepts and methods to educational settings. In particular, Eisenhart has studied culture, gender relations, women’s experiences, and women in science. She has conducted research in elementary and secondary schools, colleges, universities, and work places. Her most important works include: Educated in Romance: Women, Achievement, and College Culture (with Dorothy Holland); Women’s Science: Learning and Succeeding from the Margins (with Elizabeth Finkel); and Designing Classroom Research (with Hilda Borko). Her teaching areas are anthropology and education, ethnographic research methods, and introduction to research design. In her current research project, she developed a program to encourage high school minority girls’ interest in engineering and IT and is studying how the program and its goals fit into the context of the girls’ lives. She is a fellow of the American Anthropological Association and a member of the National Academy of Education. Eisenhart was the 2001 recipient of the Elizabeth Gee Award for outstanding contributions to research, teaching, and service for women. In 2003 she won the university’s highest honor, the Distinguished Research Lectureship Award for a career of outstanding scholarship. http://www.colorado.edu/education/faculty/margareteisenhart

 Richard Elmore is a professor of education at Harvard University and a senior research fellow with the Consortium for Policy Research in Education, funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Educational Research and Improvement. He is currently director of a CPRE research project on school accountability. He is also co-principal investigator of a multi-year study of instructional improvement and professional development in Community District #2, New York City, with Lauren Resnick and Anthony Alvarado, funded by OERI/ED through the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. Elmore holds a bachelor's degree in political science from Whitman College; a master's degree in political science from the Claremont Graduate School, and a doctorate in educational policy from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is co-author with Bruce Fuller and Gary Orfield of Who Chooses, Who Loses? Culture, Institutions, and the Unequal Effects of School Choice, and with Susan Fuhrman of The Governance of Curriculum. His other publications include Restructuring in the Classroom (with Penelope Peterson and Sarah McCarthey), Getting to Scale with Good Educational Practice, andInvesting in Teacher Learning: Staff Development and Instructional Improvement in Community School District #2, New York City. His most recent publications are: When Accountability Knocks, Will Anyone Answer?, co-authored with Charles Abelmann, Building a New Structure for School Leadership, and Bridging the Gap Between Standards and Achievement.  
http://hugse9.harvard.edu/gsedata/resource_pkg.profile?vperson_id=315

Edgar Epps came to the UWM School of Education following a distinguished career as professor of urban education at the University of Chicago. His interests in sociology, social stratification and social mobility led him to investigate the role of education in social mobility. He studies education from the sociologist's viewpoint, rather than the educator's viewpoint. Epps has a longstanding research interest in race, class and educational opportunity, including minority students' access to higher education. He is also interested in how desegregation is playing out in urban school districts, as well as the effects of vouchers, magnet schools and charter schools on urban education.

Prior to his tenure at the University of Chicago, Epps was director of the Division of Behavioral Science Research and chair of the Division of Social Sciences at Tuskegee University. He has also served on faculties of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Florida A&M. Epps has written extensively and received many honors, including the DuBois, Johnson, Frazier Award from the American Sociological Association, the W.E.B. Du Bois Distinguished Lecture Award from the American Educational Research Association and the Giant in Science Award from the Quality Education for Minorities Mathematics, Science and Engineering Network.

Frederick Erickson is George F. Kneller Professor of Anthropology of Education at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where from 2000-2006 he has also been director of research at the Corinne A. Seeds University Elementary School, UCLA's laboratory school. He received his bachelors and masters degrees in the history of music and his PhD in education at Northwestern University. His contribution to the field of anthropology of education has earned him numerous honors and awards including Spencer and Annenberg Institute for Public Policy fellowships, a Fulbright Award, and an Award for Scholarly Contributions to Educational Anthropology from the American Anthropological Association. Erickson’s writings on the microethnography of classroom and family interaction, and especially how this interaction affects disadvantaged students, continue to be ground-breaking and widely cited. His recent book, Talk and Social Theory: Ecologies of Speaking and Listening in Everyday Life (Polity Press, 2004) received an Outstanding Book Award for 2005 from the American Educational Research Association. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Research on Language and Social Interaction and Teachers College Record. In 1998-99 he was a fellow in residence at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, to which he returns as a fellow for the academic year 2006-07. http://gseis.ucla.edu/people/ferickson

Michael J. Feuer is the Dean of the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at The George Washington University, a position he assumed September 1, 2010. For the previous 17 years he held several positions at the National Research Council of the National Academies, most recently as the executive director of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Prior to joining the NRC Feuer was senior analyst and project director at the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment. He received a BA in English literature from Queens College of the City University of New York, an MA in public management from the Wharton School, and the PhD in public policy analysis from the University of Pennsylvania.  Feuer has lived in Israel and France, studied at the Hebrew University and the Sorbonne, and was on the faculty of Drexel University from 1981-1986. He has published in numerous academic journals and has had reviews, articles, and poems in newspapers and magazines in Washington, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and New York. Michael's most recent book is Moderating the Debate: Rationality and the Promise of American Education, published by Harvard Education Press in 2006. He is a member of the National Academy of Education, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a fellow of the American Educational Research Association. Michael lives in Washington with his wife, Regine B. Feuer. The Feuers have two grown children.

Robert Floden is University Distinguished Professor of Teacher Education, Measurement & Quantitative Methods, Educational Psychology, Educational Policy, and Mathematics Education at Michigan State University. Floden received an AB with honors in philosophy from Princeton University and an MS in statistics and PhD in philosophy of education from Stanford University. He has studied teacher education and other influences on teaching and learning, including work on the cultures of teaching, on teacher development, on the character and effects of teacher education, and on how policy is linked to classroom practice. He is currently working on the development of tools for studying classroom processes that help students develop robust mathematical understanding for use in solving algebra word problems. Floden has been president of the Philosophy of Education Society, a member of the NRC Committee on Education Research, an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the University of Tuebingen, and Fulbright Specialist at Pontificia Universidad Católica, Santiago, Chile. He received the Margaret B. Lindsey Award for Distinguished Research in Teacher Education from the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. Floden’s work has been published in the Handbook of Research on Teaching, the Handbook of Research on Teacher Education, the Handbook of Research on Mathematics Teaching and Learning, and in many journals and books.

Sarah Freedman studies the teaching and learning of written language, as well as ways English is taught in schools. She has worked with teacher researchers in urban, multicultural settings. For this work, she and her collaborators won the Multicultural Book Award from the National Association of Multicultural Educators for the book Inside City Schools: Investigating Literacy in Multicultural Classrooms, published by Teachers College Press in 1999. The same book was her second volume to win the Ed Frye Book Award from the National Reading Conference.

She had won previously in 1994 for her Harvard University Press book, Exchanging Writing, Exchanging Cultures: Lessons in School Reform from the United States and Great Britain. That book also won the Richard Meade Award from the National Council of Teachers of English. Freedman wrote Response to Student Writing (1987) and edited The Acquisition of Written Language: Response and Revision (1985). She also completed a study, "Teaching English in Untracked Classrooms," for which she won the Purves award for research with important implications for practice. A co-edited book, The First year of Teaching: Classroom Research to Increase Student Learning, will be published by Teachers College Press in Summer, 2014.

She is a fellow of the American Educational Research Associated, an associate of the National Conference for Research in the Language Arts, and has served as an adviser for many groups, including the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, the National Assessment of Educational Progress, and the Children's Television Workshop. She has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences and at the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Study and Conference Center. In recent years, she has added an emphasis on social studies, studying the Role of Education in Reconstructing Societies after Genocide in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. She is completing a 5-year grant from the Spencer Foundation to collaborate with Facing History and Ourselves to study how youth in Northern Ireland, South Africa and the United States develop as civic actors. http://gse.berkeley.edu/people/sarah-freedman

Susan Fuhrman is the President of Teachers College, Columbia University, founding Director and Chair of the Management Committee of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE), and Past-President of the National Academy of Education (to which she was first elected member in 2002, named Secretary-Treasurer in 2005, and named President in 2009). Dr. Fuhrman’s substantial leadership track record includes, most recently, her term as Dean of the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education from 1995-2006, where she was also the school’s George and Diane Weiss Professor of Education. While at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Fuhrman was influential in creating a new community school as a partnership between the University and the city of Philadelphia. She is a former Vice President of the American Educational Research Association as well as a former Trustee Board member of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and a former non-executive Director of Pearson plc, the international education and publishing company. Dr. Fuhrman received bachelors and masters’ degrees in history from Northwestern University and a Ph.D. in political science and education from Teachers College and Columbia University. Her research interests include accountability in education, intergovernmental relationships, and standards-based reform, and she has written widely on education policy and finance; among her edited books are The State of Education Policy Research (with David K. Cohen and Fritz Mosher, 2007); and The Public Schools (The Institutions of American Democracy Series, with Marvin Lazerson, 2005). Through the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE), she leads and conducts a variety of research with significant financial support from the U.S. Department of Education, the National Science Foundation and private funding sources. Dr. Fuhrman’s work has been recognized by a wide variety of international, national, state, and local organizations.
http://www.tc.edu/fuhrman

Adam Gamoran is the president of the William T. Grant Foundation, a charitable organization that supports research to improve the lives of young people. He spent three decades at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he held the John D. MacArthur Chair in Sociology and Educational Policy Studies. His many roles at UW-Madison included director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, chair of the sociology department, and interim dean of the School of Education. His research interests include stratification and inequality in education and school reform. Recent studies have focused on interventions to improve performance and reduce gaps, including a professional development program to improve elementary teaching and learning in Los Angeles, and a family engagement program to boost children’s academic and social outcomes by strengthening relationships among families and between families and schools, first in San Antonio and Phoenix, and later in Philadelphia. Each of these studies involved large-scale cluster-randomized trials. Gamoran is the lead author of Transforming Teaching in Math and Science: How Schools and Districts Can Support Change (Teachers College Press, 2003) and editor of Standards-Based Reform and the Poverty Gap: Lessons for No Child Left Behind (Brookings Institution Press, 2007). He also co-edited Methodological Advances in Cross-National Surveys of Educational Achievement (National Academy Press, 2002) and Stratification in Higher Education (Stanford University Press, 2007). He served on the National Research Council’s Board on Science Education, chaired the Independent Advisory Panel of the National Assessment of Career and Technical Education for the U.S. Department of Education, and was twice appointed by President Obama to serve on the National Board for Education Sciences. http://www.wtgrantfdn.org/about_us/staff/adam-gamoran

David Pierpont Gardner was president of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. He has also served as president of both the University of Utah and the University of California. He received his BS from Brigham Young University and his MA and PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. Gardner has received the California School Board’s Research Foundation Hall of Fame Award, the James Bryant Conant Award, and the Fulbright Fortieth Anniversary Distinguished Fellow Award. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, a member of the American Philosophical Society, and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also an honorary fellow of Clare Hall, Cambridge University, England and chaired the J. Paul Getty Trust in Los Angeles, California. His publications include: Earning my Degree: Memoirs of an American University PresidentThe California Oath Controversy; and Higher Education and Government: An Uneasy Alliance.

Howard Gardner is the Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is a leading thinker about education and human development; he has studied and written extensively about intelligence, creativity, leadership, and professional ethics. He has received honorary degrees from twenty-nine colleges and universities, including institutions in Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Greece, Ireland, Israel, Italy, South Korea and Spain. Gardner’s most recent books include Good Work, Changing Minds,The Development and Education of the Mind, Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons, and Truth, Beauty, and Goodness Reframed. His most recent book, co-authored with Katie Davis, is The App Generation, published in the fall of 2013. He is the winner of the 2011 Asturias Prize in Social Science.
http://pzweb.harvard.edu/PIs/HG.htm
 
http://www.howardgardner.com

James Paul Gee, formerly the Tashia Morgridge Professor of Reading at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is now the Mary Lou Fulton Presidential Professor of Literacy Studies at Arizona State University. He received his PhD in linguistics in 1975 from Stanford University and has published widely in linguistics and education. His book Sociolinguistics and Literacies (1990) was one of the founding documents in the formation of the "New Literacy Studies", an interdisciplinary field devoted to studying language, learning, and literacy in an integrated way in the full range of their cognitive, social, and cultural contexts. His book An Introduction to Discourse Analysis (1999) brings together his work on a methodology for studying communication in its cultural settings, an approach that has been widely influential over the last two decades. What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy (2003) offers 36 reasons why good video games produce better learning conditions than many of today's schools. Situated Language and Learning (2004) places video games within an overall theory of learning and literacy and shows how they can help us to better understand deep human learning and lead us in thinking about the reform of schools. His recent books, Why Video Games are Good for Your Soul (2005), and Good video games and good learning: Collected essays on video games, learning, and literacy (2007) collect together essays on situated learning, digital literacies, pleasure, and games.

Carol Gilligan is University Professor at New York University, and previous the Patricia A. Graham Professor of Gender Studies at Harvard University. Her research interests focus on gender in developmental psychology, particularly in studies of adolescents and preadolescents in school. She has been pivotal in developing a new paradigm for the study of gender, investigating women not only "in relation to men," but also as people with a "different voice"  in learning and society. She has received the Distinguished Publication Award, the Outstanding Book Award, the Educator's Award, the Career Contribution Award, and the Ittleson Award. Her publications include In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women's DevelopmentMapping the Moral Domain: A Contribution of Women's Thinking to Psychological Theory and Education; and Women and Therapy.

Herbert P. Ginsburg, Ph.D., is the Jacob H. Schiff Professor of Psychology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.  He has conducted basic research on the development of mathematical thinking, with particular attention to young children, disadvantaged populations, and cultural similarities and differences.  He has drawn on cognitive developmental research to develop mathematics curricula (Big Math for Little Kids) and storybooks for young children, tests of mathematical thinking, and video workshops to enhance teachers’ understanding of students’ mathematics learning. He has recently developed a model course on early mathematics education for use in colleges and universities. The course makes use of a web based computer technology (Video Interactions for Teaching and Learning [VITAL]) designed to help prospective teachers improve their craft by making meaningful connections between the cognitive analysis of children’s thinking and classroom practice. Also, he is engaged in creating computer-based systems (MCLASS: MATH) for helping teachers to conduct basic clinical interviews to assess children's mathematical knowledge. With colleagues, he is developing computer software,MathemAntics, to foster young children’s (from 3 years to grade 3) mathematics learning.

Gene V Glass is a Research Professor in the School of Education at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He is Emeritus Regents' Professor at Arizona State University. He received his BA in German and mathematics from the University of Nebraska and a MS and PhD in educational psychology from the University of Wisconsin. He served as President of the American Educational Research Association in 1975. Glass has made many important contributions to education statistics, notably his development of meta-analysis. He applied meta-analysis to his often-cited research on the relationship of class size and achievement.He has published more than 15 books and 200 articles in scholarly and professional journals. Glass is the founding editor of Education Policy Analysis Archives, and editor of Education Review. In 2006, he was honored with the Distinguished Contributions to Educational Research award of AERA. http://www.gvglass.info/

Susan R. Goldman, (PhD., University of Pittsburgh) is Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Psychology, and Education and Co-Director of the Learning Sciences Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She conducts research on subject matter learning, instruction, assessment, and roles for technology, especially in literacy and mathematics. A particular focus of her current research is on understanding the literacy demands in different disciplinary contexts and the implications of these demands for supporting learning. She is pursuing this work in the context of a recently funded major initiative of the Institute for Education Sciences, U. S. Department of Education, Reading for Understanding Across Grades 6 through 12: Evidence-Based Argumentation for Disciplinary Learning. As Principal Investigator for this grant, she is coordinating a research and development collaboration among 5 institutions (University of Illinois at Chicago, Northern Illinois University, Northwestern University, WestEd, and Inquirium LLC) and several school districts. They are researching the processes, instructional practices, and materials needed to support evidence-based argumentation from multiple sources in literature, history, and science across grades 6 to 12. In other work, Goldman is focusing on the language demands of ninth grade algebra. In the assessment area, she is developing web-based tools for measuring digital literacy skills, including selection, analysis, and synthesis of multiple information sources in the context of inquiry tasks. She is also examining the cognitive, psychometric, and instructional validity of embedded assessments in two standards based mathematics curriculum. She collaborates with educational practitioners to bridge research and practice, and has recently completed a project that focused on building capacity for high quality teaching and student learning in literacy in K – 8 schools. Goldman is widely published in discourse, psychology, and education. She is Executive Editor for Cognition & Instruction and Associate Editor for Journal of Educational Psychology. She is on the editorial board of Reading Research Quarterly, Journal of the Learning Sciences, andEducational Psychologist. Goldman is a board member and President of the International Society of the Learning Sciences (2011-2012).

Louis Gomez is the MacArthur Chair in Digital Media and Learning at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education & Information Studies. Before joining the UCLA faculty he was the Helen S. Faison Professor of Urban Education and Sr. Scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC) at The University of Pittsburgh. Professor Gomez is also currently serving as a Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in Palo Alto, Ca. . His scholarship focuses on understanding how to support organizational change in schools and other institutions. Along with his colleagues, Professor Gomez has been dedicated to collaborative research and development with urban communities to bring the current state-of-the-art in instruction and support for community formation to traditionally underserved schools. Most recently, Professor Gomez has turned his attention to problem solving research and development. This is R&D organized around high-leverage problems embedded in the day-to-day work of teaching and learning and the institutions in which these activities occur. Professor Gomez received a B.A. in Psychology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and a Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of California at Berkeley.

Thomas L. Good ( Ph.D., Indiana University ) is a professor and head of the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Arizona. His previous appointments were at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Missouri-Columbia. His policy interests include school choice and youth. His research interests include the communication of performance expectations in classroom settings and the analysis of effective instruction, especially in schools that serve children who reside in poverty. His work has been supported by numerous agencies, including the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Mental Health, the Carnegie Corporation, and the William T. Grant Foundation. He has been a Fulbright Fellow (Australia) and served as long-term editor of the Elementary School Journal (published by the University of Chicago press). He has published numerous books, including "Looking in Classrooms," coauthored with Jere Brophy; Listening in Classrooms,” co-authored with Mary McCaslin; and America’s Teenagers – Myths and Realities”, co-authored with Sharon Nichols. His most recent book, co-authored with Alyson Lavigne, is "Teacher and Student Evalution: Moving Beyond the Failure of School Reform". His books have been published in various languages including Chinese, German, Japanese, and Spanish. He is a fellow of two divisions in the American Psychological Association and is a fellow of the American Educational Research Association.

Edmund Gordon is the John M. Musser Professor of Psychology, Emeritus at Yale University, Richard March Hoe Professor, Emeritus of Psychology and Education, at Teachers College, Columbia University and Director Emeritus of the Institute for Urban and Minority Education (IUME) at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is also the Senior Scholar in Residence at the SUNY Rockland Community College. Professor Gordon's distinguished career spans professional practice, scholarly life as a minister, clinical and counseling psychologist, research scientist, author, editor, and professor. He has held appointments at several of the nation’s leading universities including Howard, Yeshiva, Columbia, City University of New York, and Yale. Additionally, Dr. Gordon has served as visiting professor at City College of New York and Harvard University. From July 2000 until August, 2001, he was Vice President for Academic Affairs and Interim Dean of Faculty at Teachers College, Columbia University. Dr. Gordon has been recognized as a preeminent member of his discipline. He is an elected Fellow of various prestigious associations including the American Psychological Association, American Society of Psychological Science, the American Association for Orthopsychiatry and Fellow and Life Member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1968 he was elected member of the National Academy of Education. Among his most recent honors is the Edmund W. Gordon Chair for Policy Evaluation and Research” created by the Educational Testing Service to recognize his lasting contributions to developments in education including Head Start, compensatory education, school desegregation, and supplementary education. In 2005 Columbia University named its campus in Harlem, N. Y. the Edmund W. Gordon Campus of Teachers College, Columbia University. Dr. Gordon has been named one of America’s most prolific and thoughtful scholars. He is the author of more than 200 articles and 18 books. Edmund W. Gordon, Ed. D. has been married to Susan G. Gordon, M.D. since 1948. Together they conceived and raised four children, whom they claim as their most important achievements.

Patricia Albjerg Graham is Charles Warren Professor of the History of Education Emerita at Harvard. She received her BS and MS from Purdue University and her PhD from Columbia University. Graham has received a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, a Woodrow Wilson fellowship, and a Radcliffe Institute fellowship. Her books includeProgressive Education: From Arcady to Academe, Community and Class in American Education, Women in Higher Education, S.O.S.: Sustain Our Schools, and Schooling America. Formerly she was director of the National Institute of Education (1977-1979), dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education (1982-1991) and president of the Spencer Foundation (1991-2000).

Pam Grossman is the Nomellini-Olivier Professor of Education at the Stanford University School of Education.   Her research interests include teacher education and professional education more broadly, teacher knowledge, and the teaching of English in secondary schools. She has been engaged with a five-year study of pathways into teaching in New York City schools, focusing on the features of preparation that affect student achievement. She is currently investigating the classroom practices of middle-school English teachers that are associated with student achievement.  She is a Former fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and currently serves as the Faculty Director of the new Center to Support Excellence in Teaching.  A former high school English teacher, Grossman also teaches the prospective English teachers in Stanford’s teacher education program.

John T. Guthrie is the Jean Mullan Professor of Literacy in the Department of Human Development at the University of Maryland, College Park. As Director of the Maryland Literacy Research Center, he studies motivations and strategies in reading at all school levels. Before coming to Maryland, he was Research Director for the International Reading Association. He began his career at Johns Hopkins University, where he founded the Kennedy School for children with reading disabilities. His works on reading engagement have been published in the Reading Research Quarterly, the Journal of Educational Psychology, and the Elementary School Journal. He is a recipient of the Oscar Causey Award for Outstanding Reading Research, a member of the International Reading Association Hall of Fame, and the 2004 recipient of the University of Maryland System Regents’ Award for research/scholarship/creative activity.

Kris D. Gutiérrez is Professor of Literacy and Learning Sciences and holds the Inaugural Provost’s Chair at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She is also Professor Emerita of Social Research Methodology in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles where she also served as Director of the Education Studies Minor and Director of the Center for the Study of Urban Literacies. Gutiérrez was a former President of the American Educational Research Association; she is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, the National Conference on Research on Language and Literacy, and the Education and the Public Interest Center. Her research examines learning in designed learning environments, with particular attention to students from non-dominant communities and English Learners. Her work on Third Spaces examines the affordances of syncretic approaches to literacy learning and re-mediation of functional systems of learning. Professor Gutiérrez's research has been published widely in premier academic journals and is a co-editor of Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Additionally, Professor Gutierrez has written a column for the Los Angeles Times’ Reading Page. Gutiérrez was recently nominated by President Obama to be a member of the National Board for the Institute of Education Sciences. She has received numerous awards, including the 2010 AERA Hispanic Research in Elementary, Secondary, or Postsecondary Education Award and the 2010 Inaugural Award for Innovations in Research on Diversity in Teacher Education, Division K (AERA) and was the 2010 Osher Fellow at the Exploratorium Museum of Science. Previously, Gutiérrez received the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Distinguished Scholar Award 2007 and was the 2005 recipient of the AERA Division C Sylvia Scribner Award for influencing the field of learning and instruction, and was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences 2006-07. She serves on numerous policy-making and advisory boards. She served as a member of the US Department of Education Reading First Advisory Committee and recently served as a member of President Obama’s Education Policy Transition Team. Professor Gutiérrez was a former President of the American Educational Research Association, and President of the National Conference on Research on Language and Literacy. Professor Gutiérrez was also recently identified as one of the 2009 Top 100 influential Hispanics in the nation by Hispanic Business Magazine. Gutiérrez has held Noted Scholar positions in Japan and Canada and is an invited speaker both nationally and internationally. Gutiérrez has used her expertise to improve the educational condition of immigrant and underserved students in out of school and formal schooling settings and to design effective models for teacher preparation. For over 15 years, Professor served as the principal investigator and director of an after-school computer learning club for low-income and immigrant children (UCLinks, Las Redes) and for over ten years was the Director of the UCLA Migrant Scholars Leadership Program, a residential summer academic program for high school student from migrant farmworker backgrounds. Both programs have been touted as exemplary models of excellence and transformative change.

Amy Gutmann is president and Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of the University of Pennsylvania. Among her books are Why Deliberative Democracy? (with Dennis Thompson), Identity in Democracy, Democratic Education, Liberal Equality, Democracy and Disagreement (with Thompson) and Color Conscious (with Kwame Anthony Appiah),which received the American Political Science Association's Ralph J. Bunche Award, North American Society for Social Philosophy Book Award, and the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights Award. She is a member of the American Philosophical Society, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and W.E.B. DuBois Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Gutmann received her BA from Radcliffe College, MSc from the London School of Economics, and PhD from Harvard University. In 2003, Gutmann was awarded the Centennial Medal by Harvard University for "graduate alumni who have made exceptional contributions to society." In 2006, she received the Alumnae Recognition Award from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. She has served as Chair of President Obama's Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues since 2009 and was named to the national Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences in 2011. http://www.upenn.edu/president/meet-president/biography

Edward Haertel is the Jacks Family Professor of Education, Emeritus at Stanford University, where his research and teaching focus on quantitative research methods, psychometrics, and educational policy, especially test-based accountability and the use of test data for educational program evaluation. Haertel's early work investigated the use of latent class models for item response data. His recent research projects have included studies of standard setting and standards-based score interpretations, statistical properties of test-based accountability systems, metric-free measures of score gaps and trends, and examination of value-added models for teacher evaluation from a psychometric perspective. Recent publications include Assessment, Equity, and Opportunity to Learn (2008, co-edited with P. A. Moss, J. Gee, D. Pullin, and L. Young), ”Evaluating Teacher Evaluation” (2013, with L. Darling-Hammond, A. Amrein-Beardsley, and J. Rothstein, in Phi Delta Kappan), “The Briefing Book Method” (2012, with J. Beimers and J. Miles, in Setting Performance Standards, 2nd ed.), and Reliability and Validity of Inferences About Teachers Based on Student Test Scores (14th William H. Angoff Memorial Lecture, 2013). Haertel has served as president of the National Council on Measurement in Education, chairs the Technical Advisory Committee concerned with the design and evolution of California's test-based school accountability system, chairs the NRC's Board on Testing and Assessment (BOTA), and from 1997 to 2003 served on the National Assessment Governing Board. http://www.stanford.edu/~haertel/

Kenji Hakuta is the Lee J. Jacks Professor of Education at Stanford University. An experimental psycholinguist by training, he is best known for his work in the areas of bilingualism and the acquisition of English in immigrant students. He is the author of numerous research papers and books, including Mirror of Language: The Debate on Bilingualism and In Other Words: The Science and Psychology of Second Language Acquisition. He chaired a National Academy of Sciences report Improving Schooling for Language Minority Children, and co-edited a book on affirmative action in higher education,Compelling Interest: Examining the Evidence on Racial Dynamics in Higher Education. Hakuta is also active in education policy. He has testified to Congress and other public bodies on a variety of topics, including language policy, the education of language minority students, affirmative action in higher education, and improvement of quality in educational research. He has served as an expert witness in education litigation involving minority students. Hakuta received his BA Magna Cum Laude in Psychology and Social Relations, and his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology, both from Harvard University. He has been on the faculty at Stanford since 1989, except for three years (2003-2006) when he helped start the University of California at Merced as its Founding Dean of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts. His prior academic appointments have been at Yale University (Psychology), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (Education). He was a Fellow at the Center Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, is an elected member of the National Academy of Education and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Linguistics and Language Sciences). http://www.stanford.edu/~hakuta

Eric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. He is also chairman of the Executive Committee for the Texas Schools Project at the University of Texas at Dallas, a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a member of the Koret Task Force on K-12 Education. He served as a member of the Board of Directors of the National Board for Education Sciences from 2004-2010 and was Chair from 2008-2010. He is an expert on educational policy, specializing in the economics and finance of schools. His on-going research spans a number of the most important areas of education policy including the impacts of high stakes accountability and of class size reduction and the importance of teacher quality. His books include Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses: Solving the Funding-Achievement Puzzle in America’s Public Schools, Courting Failure, Handbook on the Economics of Education, The Economics of Schooling and School Quality, Assessing Policies for Retirement Income, Improving America's Schools, Assessing Knowledge of Retirement Behavior, Modern Political Economy, Making Schools Work, Educational Performance of the Poor, Improving Information for Social Policy Decisions, Statistical Methods for Social Scientists, andEducation and Race. In addition, he has published numerous articles in professional journals. He was awarded the Fordham Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in 2004, and he is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy. He completed his Ph.D. in Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1965-1974. http://www.hanushek.net

Robert M. Hauser is Executive Director of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences and Vilas Research Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He received his BA from the University of Chicago and his MA and PhD from the University of Michigan. Hauser has received the Paul F. Lazarsfeld Award, Willard Waller Award, and a national teaching award from the American Sociological Association and fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Statistical Association and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. His publications include: Education, Occupation, and Earnings: Achievement in the Early Career (with William Sewell); The Process of Stratification: Trends and Analyses (with David Featherman); Indicators of Children’s Well-Being (with Brett Brown and William Prosser); and High Stakes: Testing for Tracking, Promotion, and Graduation (with Jay Heubert). http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~hauser/

Shirley Brice Heath is Margery Baily Professor of English and Dramatic Literature and Professor of Linguistics Emerita, Stanford University, and past Professor at Large, Brown University (2003-2010). A linguistic anthropologist by training (Columbia University), she is best known in the United States for her longitudinal studies of linguistic development in the learning environments of families and communities. As a Latin Americanist, she is known for her research on language policies and bilingualism in Mexico. Internationally, she is widely recognized for her studies of learning in studios and laboratories in which young people engage in creative work linked to the sciences and arts. Her books include Words at work and play: Three decades in family and community life, Ways with words: Language, life, and work in communities and classrooms, On Ethnography: Approaches to language and literacy research (with Brian Street), The Braid of Literature (with Shelby Wolf), Identity and Inner-city youth: Beyond ethnicity and gender (with Milbrey W. McLaughlin), Language in the USA (with Charles Ferguson), and Telling Tongues: Language Policy in Mexico, colony to nation. Her honors include the MacArthur Foundation fellowship, David H. Russell Research Award from the National Council of Teachers of English, John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, and Grawemeyer Award in Education (jointly with Milbrey W. McLaughlin).
http://www.shirleybriceheath.net

James J. Heckman is the Henry Schultz Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at The University of Chicago. His recent research deals with such issues as evaluation of social programs, econometric models of discrete choice and longitudinal data, the economics of the labor market, and alternative models of the distribution of income. Professor Heckman has received numerous awards for his work, including the John Bates Clark Award of the American Economic Association in 1983, the 2000 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, the 2005 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Achievement in Labor Economics, the 2005 University College Dublin Ulysses Medal, and the 2005 and 2007 Aigner award from the Journal of Econometrics. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society, the American Statistical Association, the International Statistical Institute, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Larry V. Hedges is Board of Trustees Professor of Statistics, Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research, and Professor in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. He received his BA from the University of California, San Diego, and his MA and PhD from Stanford University. His research interests include the development of statistical methods for social research, the use of statistical concepts in social and cognitive theory, the demography of talent and academic achievement, and educational policy analysis. His books include Statistical Methods for Meta-Analysis (with Ingram Olkin), The Handbook of Research Synthesis (with Harris Cooper), and The Social Organization of Schooling (with Barbara Schneider). http://www.northwestern.edu/ipr/people/hedges.html

Jeffrey Henig is a professor of political science and education at Teachers College and a professor of political science at Columbia University. He is the author or coauthor of ten books, including The Color of School Reform: Race, Politics and the Challenge of Urban Education (Princeton, 1999) and Building Civic Capacity: The Politics of Reforming Urban Schools (Kansas, 2001), both of which were named- in 1999 and 2001, respectively- the best book written on urban politics by the Urban Politics Section of the American Political Science Association. Spin Cycle: How Research Gets Used in Policy Debates. The Case of Charter Schools (Russell Sage, 2008) focuses on the controversy surrounding the charter school study by the American Federation of Teachers and its implications for understanding politics, politicization, and the use of research to inform public discourse; it won the American Educational Research Association’s (AERA) Outstanding Book Award, 2010. His most recent book, The End of Exceptionalism in American Education, was published b Harvard Education Press in January 2013.

George Hillocks taught in the Education and English Language and Literature departments and was the director of the highly regarded MAT Program in English at the University of Chicago. He received his BA in English from the College of Wooster and his MA and PhD in English from Case Western Reserve. He received a Diploma in English Studies from the University of Edinburgh (Scotland). Hillocks has had a significant influence on the teaching of English, most notably in the area of English composition. For his book Teaching Writing as Reflective Practice (1997), Hillocks received the David H. Russell Award from the National Council of Teachers of English for distinguished research in the teaching of English. His most recent book is The Testing Trap: How State Writing Assessments Control Learning(Teachers College Press, 2002). He received the 2004 Distinguished Service Award from the National Council of Teachers of English. His book, Narrative Writing: Learning a New Model for Teaching, was published in 2007 by Heinemann. In 2008, it received the Richard Meade for excellence in research in English education. In 2010, he received the Lifetime Distinguished Researcher Award from the National Conference on Research in Language and Literacy. He is now professor emeritus and a speaker and consultant.

Paul W. Holland held the Frederic M. Lord Chair in Measurement and Statistics in the Research and Development Division at the Educational Testing Service (ETS) in Princeton, New Jersey until he retired in 2006. His educational background includes a MA and PhD in statistics from Stanford University and a BA in mathematics from the University of Michigan. His association with ETS began in 1975. In 1979 he became the director of the Research Statistics Group. In 1986 Holland was appointed ETS's first distinguished research scientist. He left ETS in 1993 to join the faculty at University of California, Berkeley, as a professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Department of Statistics, but returned in 2000 to ETS. He has made significant contributions to the following applications of statistics to social science research: categorical data analysis, social networks, test equating, differential item functioning, test security issues, causal inference in nonexperimental research, and the foundations of item response theory. His current research interests include: kernel equating methods, population invariance of test linking, and causal inference in program evaluation and policy research.

Jacqueline Jordan Irvine is Charles Howard Candler Professor of Urban Education Emerita in the Division of Educational Studies at Emory University. Professor Irvine's specialization is in multicultural education and urban teacher education, particularly the education of African American students. Her books include Black Students and School Failure (Greenwood),Growing Up African American in Catholic Schools (Teachers College Press), Critical Knowledge for Diverse Students (AACTE), Culturally Responsive Lesson Planning for Elementary and Middle Grades (McGraw-Hill), In Search of Wholeness: African American Teachers and Their Culturally Specific Pedagogy (Palgrave Publishers), and Educating Teachers for Diversity: Seeing with the Cultural Eye (Teachers College Press). Black Students and School Failure received the Outstanding Writing Award from The American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education and was selected as a Outstanding Academic Book by the American Association of College and University Research Librarians. In addition, she has published numerous articles and book chapters. She has received the Distinguished Career Award from the SIG on Black Education of the American Education Research Association, an award from the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development for exemplary contributions to the education of African American children, the 2000 Dewitt-Wallace/AERA Lecture Award, the 2001 AACTE Hunt Lecture, and the 2003 AACTE Lindsey Award for Distinguished Research in Teacher Education. At Emory University's 2000 Commencement ceremony, Professor Irvine received the Thomas Jefferson Award, the highest award given to an Emory University faculty member for service and research. A renowned educator, in 2004 Professor Irvine received the prestigious Crystal Apple Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching. At the 2005 meeting of the American Educational Research Association, she was presented AERA's Social Justice in Education Award for her efforts to advance social justice through education research.

John F. (Jack) Jennings, founded the Center on Education Policy in January 1995. From 1967 to 1994, he served as subcommittee staff director and then as general counsel for the U.S. House of Representatives' Committee on Education and Labor. In these positions, he was involved in nearly every major education debate held at the national level, including the reauthorizations of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the Vocational Education Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the Higher Education Act, the National School Lunch Act, the Child Nutrition Act, and the authorization of the Goals 2000: Educate America Act. Mr. Jennings has served on the board of trustees of the Educational Testing Service, the Title I Independent Review Panel, the Pew Forum on Standards-Based Reform, the Maryland Academic Intervention Steering Committee, and the Maryland Visionary Panel. He holds an A.B. from Loyola University and a J.D. from Northwestern University School of Law, and is a member of several legal bars, including the U.S. Supreme Court.

Susan Moore Johnson is Jerome T. Murphy Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she served as academic dean from 1993-1999. She received her AB in English Literature from Mount Holyoke College and her MAT in English and EdD in Administration, Planning, and Social Policy from Harvard University. She studies and teaches about teachers’ work, educational policy, and administrative practice. Her published books include Teacher Unions in Schools, Teachers at Work: Achieving Excellence in Our SchoolsLeading to Change: The Challenge of the New SuperintendencyFinders and Keepers: Helping New Teachers Survive and Thrive in Our Schools and Managing School Districts for High Performance (with Stacey Childress, Richard Elmore, and Allen Grossman). Currently, she is director of The Project on the Next Generation of Teachers, which conducts research about the work and careers of the nation’s teaching force. http://www.gse.harvard.edu/~ngt/

Carl Kaestle is University Professor and Professor of Education, History, and Public Policy Emeritus at Brown University. He received his BA from Yale College and his MAT and PhD from Harvard University. Kaestle has been a Fellow at the Shelby Cullom Davis Center (Princeton), the Charles Warren Center (Harvard) and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Stanford). He was Director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research from 1986-1988 and president of the National Academy of Education from 1993-1997. His books include The Evolution of an Urban School System, Education and Social Change in Nineteenth-Century Massachusetts, Pillars of the Republic: Common Schools and American Society, Literacy in the United States: Readers and Reading since 1880 and Print in Motion: The Expansion of Reading in the United States, 1880-1940.  From 2001 to 2005 he directed the Advanced Studies Fellowship Program at Brown, whose Fellows produced the book, To Educate a Nation: Federal and National Strategies of School Reform. Kaestle is presently working on a history of the federal role in education. http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Education/facpages/Carl.html

Sharon Lynn Kagan is the Virginia and Leonard Marx Professor of Early Childhood and Family Policy and Co-Director of the National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College, Columbia University, and Professor Adjunct at Yale University's Child Study Center. Dr. Kagan, recognized nationally and internationally for her work related to the care and education of young children and their families, is a frequent consultant to the White House, Congress, the National Governors’ Association, the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services, numerous states, foundations, corporations, and professional associations, and serves on over 40 national boards or panels. She has been the President of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), the Co-Chair of the National Education Goals Panel on Goal One, Chair of the Family Support America’s Board of Directors, a member of President Clinton’s education transition team, and National Commissions on Head Start and Chapter 1. She is dedicated to early childhood education, having been a Head Start Teacher and Director, as well as an administrator in the public schools and Director of the New York City Mayor’s Office of Early Childhood Education. In addition to these contributions, Dr. Kagan is globally recognized for her unique scholarship. In over 225 publications including 13 volumes, Kagan’s analytic work has helped the field define school readiness, the early childhood system, dimensions of collaboration, and leadership in early care and education. With scores of grants from America’s leading foundations and the federal government, she has researched early childhood pedagogy, strategies for service integration, and the evaluation of social programs. She is currently working around the globe with UNICEF to establish early learning standards in Armenia, Brazil, Cambodia, China, Ghana, Jordan, Mongolia, Paraguay, Turkmenistan, and Viet Nam. Perhaps most importantly, however, Dr. Kagan may be best known as the only woman in the history of American Education to be recognized for these contributions with its most prestigious awards: the 2004 Distinguished Service Award from the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), the 2005 James Bryant Conant Award for Lifetime Service to Education from the Education Commission of the States (ECS), and the Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education.

Michael Katz is Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History, co-director of the Urban Studies Graduate Certificate Program at the University of Pennsylvania, and research associate in the Population Studies Center. He received his BA, MAT, and EdD from Harvard University. Katz has received the Albert C. Corey Prize and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, Shelby Cullom Davis Center, the Institute for Advanced Study, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Open Society Institute, and the Woodrow Wilson Center. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Social Insurance and a fellow of the Society of American Historians. He is a past president of the History of Education Society and the Urban History Association. His publications include The Irony of Early School Reform: Educational Innovation in Mid-Nineteenth Century Massachusetts; In the Shadow of the Poorhouse: A Social History of Welfare in America ;Improving Poor People: The Welfare State, the Underclass, and Urban Schools as History; and The Price of Citizenship: Redefining the American Welfare Stateand, with Mark J. Stern, One Nation Divisible: What America Was and What It Is Becoming(see www.onenationdivisible.net). He received the Binkeley-Stephenson Award from the Organization of American Historians for the best article in the Journal of American History in 1995. In 2007, he received the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Ph.D. Mentoring and Teaching at the University of Pennsylvania. http://www.history.upenn.edu/faculty/katz.shtml

James Kelly has had a distinguished career in education policy, education finance, philanthropy, and teaching standards, assessments and certification. He is Senior Advisor to the President of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and chairs the Board of Advisors for TeachingWorks, a nationally-important teacher education initiative at the University of Michigan. From 2008-2010 he was co-director of Strategic Management of Human Capital; the project’s national task force, selected states and dozens of urban school districts were engaged in analyzing successful human capital reforms and developing policy proposals for further reforms that emphasize talent recruitment and performance management in urban districts. From 1987-1999 he was founding president and CEO of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), where he led efforts to create National Board Certification (NBC), the nation’s advanced professional certification program for accomplished elementary and secondary teachers. Almost all states provide recognition for NBC and pay higher compensation to National Board Certified Teachers, the first time in the nation’s history that states have provided additional salary increments to teachers recognized as meeting higher standards for teaching quality. Despite high standards and rigorous assessments, over 100,000 teachers have become Board-certified. From 1970-1981, Kelly was senior program officer at the Ford Foundation, where he influenced state education finance and tax policies to make their support for public education more equitable. He was president of Spring Hill Center, a conference center in Wayzata, MN, and president of the Center for Creative Studies, in Detroit, MI. Earlier he was an assistant and associate professor at Teachers College, Columbia University, was responsible for education policy at the National Urban Coalition during the 1968-1969 urban upheavals, and worked at Punjab University in Lahore, Pakistan to establish the Institute of Education and Research at that university. Mr. Kelly began his career as a teacher, assistant principal and assistant superintendent of the public schools in Ladue, MO. His B.A. degree is from Shimer College, then an integral part of the College of the University of Chicago. His M.A. is from the University of Chicago, and his Ph.D. is from Stanford University, with concentrations in education, political science and economics. Since retiring” from the NBPTS in 1999, Mr. Kelly has served as a senior advisor to many organizations, including the World Bank, the National Academy of Sciences (working to develop their Strategic Educational Research Program), Atlantic Philanthropies, the Hunt Institute at the University of North Carolina, Standard and Poors, Widmeyer Communications, SchoolNet, Wireless Generation, the Henry Ford Learning Institute, and others. He served on the executive board of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE), and on the Board of Overseers of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. He is co-chair of Learning to Give, a non-profit project that has worked with teachers to develop over 1400 on-line teaching units to help students learn about volunteerism, philanthropy and the non-profit sector; the website of this organization is visited monthly by more than 250,000 teachers. He is a board member of the Center for Teaching Quality and the Phi Delta Kappa International Foundation. He chairs the Art Museum Committee and is vice-chair of the Governing Board of the Cranbrook Art Academy, in Bloomfield Hills, MI. For over 20 years he was a member of the board of directors of the Institute of Educational Leadership, and (also for over 20 years) is a board member of Musica Sacra, a professional choral music organization whose concerts at Carnegie Hall and other New York City venues receive rave reviews. Mentored throughout his career by extraordinarily wise leaders, Mr. Kelly in turn assists many friends and colleagues as they develop their own careers and spheres of influence. Mr. Kelly has four children and seven grandchildren. His wife, Mariam C. Noland, is president of the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan.

Jeremy Kilpatrick is Regents Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of Georgia. He received an A.B. in mathematics and an M.A. in education from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.S. in mathematics and Ph.D. in education from Stanford University. Before joining the faculty at Georgia in 1975, he taught at Teachers College, Columbia University. His research interests include teachers’ proficiency in teaching mathematics, mathematics curriculum change and its history, mathematics assessment, and the history of research in mathematics education. He received the 2007 Felix Klein Medal honoring lifetime achievement in mathematics education from the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction and the 2003 Lifetime Achievement Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics Education from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. He holds an honorary doctorate from the University of Gothenburg, is a National Associate of the National Academy of Sciences, and is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. His edited books include Adding It Up: Helping Children Learn Mathematics (with Jane Swafford and Brad Findell), A Research Companion to Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (with W. Gary Martin and Deborah Schifter), and A History of School Mathematics (with George Stanic). He recently co-chaired (with Helen Quinn) a committee on mathematics and science education for the National Academy of Education’s Education Policy White Papers Project.

Walter Kintsch is Professor Emeritus of Psychology and the former Director of the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado in Boulder. He came to the University of Colorado in 1968 after receiving a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Kansas and faculty appointments at the University of Missouri and the University of California at Riverside. His research focus has been on the study of how people understand language, using both experimental methods and computational modeling techniques. In cooperation with the Dutch linguist Teun van Dijk, he formulated the first psychological process theory of discourse comprehension in 1978. In 1988, this work was reformulated as a constraint-satisfaction process. His book Comprehension” appeared in 1998 and argues that many cognitive processes can be usefully conceptualized as comprehension processes. Kintsch received a Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association in 1992 and from the Society for Text & Discourse in 2008. He received an honorary doctorate from the Humboldt University in Berlin in 2001. http://psych.colorado.edu/~wkintsch/

Michael Kirst is a professor emeritus of education and business administration (by courtesy) at Stanford University. He is the President of the California State Board of Education. He received his AB from Dartmouth College and his MPA and PhD from Harvard University. Kirst has received the American Educational Research Association's Roald Campbell Award, a fellowship from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and was associate director of the White House Fellows Association. His publications include Political Dynamics of American Education (with Frederick Wirt), Who Controls Our Schools: American Values in Conflict, and Betraying the College Dream. Kirst is the former president of the California State Board of Education from 1977-1981. http://cepa.stanford.edu/michael-kirst

David Klahr is the Walter van Dyke Bingham Professor of Cognitive Development and Education Sciences in the Department of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from MIT and his Ph.D. in organizations and social behavior from Carnegie Mellon University. His earlier work addressed cognitive processes in such diverse areas as voting behavior, college admissions, consumer choice, peer review and problem solving. Dr. Klahr pioneered the application of information-processing analysis to questions of cognitive development, and formulated the first computational models to account for children's thinking processes. He served as Head of the Psychology Department from 1983 to 1993, and is currently Director of the Program in Interdisciplinary Education Research (PIER), a doctoral training grant funded by the Office of Education. His current research focuses on cognitive development, scientific reasoning, and cognitively-based instructional interventions in early science education. His edited, authored, and co-authored books include Cognition and Instruction (1976), Cognitive Development: An Information Processing View (1976), Production System Models of Learning and Development (1987), Complex Information Processing: the Impact of Herbert A. Simon (1989); Exploring Science: the Cognition and Development of Discovery Processes (2000); and Cognition and Instruction: 25 years of Progress (2001). He served on the three NRC committees that produced Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Educational Assessment (2001), Advancing Scientific Research in Education (2004,) and Taking Science to School: Learning and Teaching Science in Grades K-8 (2007). http://www.psy.cmu.edu/faculty/klahr/

Daniel Koretz is the Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The primary focus of his research is educational assessment, particularly as a tool of education policy. A major emphasis in his work has been the effects of high-stakes testing, including effects on schooling and the validity of score gains. His research has included studies of the effects of testing programs, the assessment of students with disabilities, international differences in the variability of student achievement, the application of value-added models to educational achievement, and the development of methods for validating scores under high-stakes conditions. His current work focuses on the design and evaluation of test-focused educational accountability systems. Dr. Koretz founded and chairs the International Project for the Study of Educational Accountability, and international network of scholars investigating improved approaches to educational accountability. His doctorate is in development psychology from Cornell University. Before obtaining his degree, Dr. Koretz taught emotionally disturbed students in public elementary and junior high schools.
http://gseweb.harvard.edu/faculty_research/profiles/profile.shtml?vperson_id=47648

Helen F. Ladd is the Edgar Thompson Professor of Public Policy Studies and professor of economics at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy. Most of her current research focuses on education policy. She is particularly interested in various aspects school accountability, education finance, teacher labor markets, and school choice. She has written numerous articles and books on charter schools and other forms of choice in North Carolina, self-governing schools and parental choice in both New Zealand and the Netherlands, market based reforms in urban school districts, voucher programs, and school reform in post-Apartheid South Africa. In addition, with colleagues at Duke University she has written extensively about school segregation, teacher labor markets, and teacher quality. She is also the editor of Holding Schools Accountable: Performance-Based Reform in Education(Brookings Institution, 1996) and co-editor (with Edward Fiske) of The Handbook of Research in Education Finance and Policy (2008), the official handbook of the American Education Finance Association. From 1996-99 she co-chaired a National Academy of Sciences Committee on Education Finance. In that capacity she is the co-editor of two books: a set of background papers, Equity and Adequacy in Education Finance and the final report, Making Money Matter: Financing America’s Schools. Prior to 1986, she taught at Dartmouth College, Wellesley College, and at Harvard University, first in the City and Regional Planning Program and then in the Kennedy School of Government. She graduated with a B.A. degree from Wellesley College in 1967, received a master's degree from the London School of Economics in 1968, and earned her Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1974. She is currently the president of the Association for Public Policy and Management and co-chair of the national campaign for a Broader, Bolder Approach to Education (Boldapproach.org). Before she shifted to education policy, her research focused on state and local public finance, and she was active in the National Tax Association, which she served as president in 1993-94. She has also been a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, a senior research fellow at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, and a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution. With the support of two Fulbright grants, she spent the spring term of 1998 in New Zealand studying that country’s education system and the spring term of 2002 doing similar research in South Africa. Most recently, she spent 6 months as a visiting researcher at the University of Amsterdam examining that country’s long experience with parental choice, significant autonomy for individual schools, and weighted student funding. https://fds.duke.edu/db/Sanford/faculty/hladd

Gloria Ladson-Billings is the Kellner Family Professor of Urban Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and faculty affiliate in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She was the 2005-2006 president of the American Educational Research Association. Ladson-Billings' research examines the pedagogical practices of teachers who are successful with African American students. She also investigates Critical Race Theory applications to education. She is the author of the critically acclaimed books The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children and Crossing Over to Canaan: The Journey of New Teachers in Diverse Classrooms, and numerous journal articles and book chapters. She is the former editor of theAmerican Educational Research Journal and a member of several editorial boards. Her work has won numerous scholarly awards including the H.I. Romnes Faculty Fellowship, the NAE/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship, and the Palmer O. Johnson outstanding research award. In 2002 she was awarded an honorary doctorate from Umeå University, Umeå Sweden. During the 2003 2004 academic year she was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. In fall of 2004 she received the George and Louise Spindler Award from the Council on Anthropology and Education for significant and ongoing contributions to the field of educational anthropology. 

P. Lindsay Chase Lansdale, Frances Willard Professor of Human Development and Social Policy at the School of Education and Social Policy, is also Associate Provost for Faculty and Fellow in the Institute for Policy Research (IPR), Northwestern University. She was the founding director of the NICHD-funded center, Cells to Society (C2S): The Center on Social Disparities and Health at IPR. Chase-Lansdale is an expert on the interface between research and social policy for children and families, a former Congressional Science Fellow sponsored by the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the first developmental psychologist to be tenured in a public policy school in the United States. She specializes in multidisciplinary research on social issues and how they affect families and the development of children, youth, and adults. Much of her work addresses family strengths that lead to children's positive social and educational outcomes in the context of economic hardship. Chase-Lansdale is a fellow in the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. She is the recipient of the Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA) Social Policy Award as well as the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) Award for Distinguished Contributions to Public Policy for Children. She is also a Fellow in Ascend at the Aspen Institute, a program designed to take a two-generation approach in policy, practice, and research on educational success and economic security for low-income parents and their young children. Chase-Lansdale received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Michigan in 1981.

Ellen Condliffe Lagemann is the Levy Institute Research Professor at Bard College, and a Senior Fellow at the Bard Prison Initiative. Between 2002 and 2009, she was the Charles Warren Professor of the History of American Education at Harvard University. She is a former Dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a former President of the Spencer Foundation. She has taught at New York University, where she was chair of the Department of the Humanities and the Social Sciences and Director of the Center for the Study of American Culture and Education, and at Columbia, where she was Professor of History and Education at Teachers College and a member of the Faculty of Arts and Science Department of History. Her publications include A Generation of Women: Education in the Lives of Progressive Reformers; Private Power for the Public Good: A History of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching; The Politics of Knowledge: The Carnegie Corporation, Philanthropy, and Public Policy; An Elusive Science: The Troubling History of Education Research; and (with Henry Lewis), What is College For?.

Magdalene Lampert is George Herbert Mead Collegiate Professor in Education and Coordinator of Program Design and Development for the Teacher Education Initiative at the School of Education, University of Michigan. She conducts research on teaching and on the learning of teaching in, from, and for practice. Lampert has received the Raymond B. Cattell Early Career Award for Programmatic Research and the Interpretive Scholarship Award for Relating Research to Practice from the American Educational Research Association (AERA), the Exemplary Research in Teaching and Teacher Education Award from Division K of AERA, and the NAEd/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship. She received her BS from Chestnut Hill College, Masters Degrees in Education from Temple University and Antioch New England Graduate School of Education, and her EdD from Harvard University. Her publications includeTeaching Problems and The Problems in Teaching; Talking Mathematics (with Merrie Blunk); and Teaching, Multimedia, and Mathematics (with Deborah Ball).

Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot is Emily Hargroves Fisher Professor of Education at Harvard University. She received her BA from Swarthmore College and her PhD from Harvard University. Lightfoot has received the MacArthur Prize Fellowship, the American Educational Research Association’s Outstanding Book Award, the Christopher Award, and the George Ledlie Prize. Her publications include The Art and Science of Portraiture (with Jessica Hoffmann Davis), The Good High School: Portraits of Character and Culture, Balm in Gilead: A Healer’s Journey, and Respect: An Exploration.

Carol D. Lee is the Edwina S. Tarry Professor of Education and Social Policy in the Learning Sciences Program at Northwestern University. She is the immediate past president of the American Educational Research Association (April, 2009-May, 2010), AERA’s representative to the World Educational Research Association, a member of the National Academy of Education, past President and Fellow of the National Conference of Research on Language and Literacy, former Vice President of Division G of the American Educational Research Association, a former fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and a fellow of the American Educational Research Association. She is a recipient of the Distinguished Service Award from the National Council of Teachers of English, Scholars of Color Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Educational Research Association, the Walder Award for Research Excellence at Northwestern University, the Distinguished Alumni Award from the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Illinois-Urbana, The President’s Pacesetters Award from the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education. Professor Lee is the author of three books including the most recent Culture, Literacy and Learning: Taking Bloom in the Midst of the Whirlwind and co-editor of Vygotskian Perspectives on Literacy Research, along with numerous other scholarly publications. Her research focuses on ecological influences on learning and development, including the Cultural Modeling Framework for the design of instruction that scaffolds knowledge constructed from youth’s everyday experience to support discipline specific learning. She is a co-founder of four schools in Chicago spanning a 38 year history, including three charter schools, serving as chairman of the Board of Directors of the Betty Shabazz International Charter Schools.

Valerie E. Lee is an Emeritus Professor of Education at the University of Michigan, as well as a faculty associate at the University's Institute for Social Research. She taught courses in the sociology of education, program evaluation, and quantitative research methods. Her research focuses on issues of educational equity, particularly on identifying characteristics of schools that make them simultaneously excellent and equitable. Much of this research is oriented to public policies that relate to educational equity. Although much of her research has focused on secondary schools, she has also been studied similar issues in the early grades. "Equity" she defines in terms of socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, and gender. Her graduate work was completed at Harvard University; before coming to Michigan she had a two-year fellowship at the Educational Testing Service. She was associated with the Center for the Organization and Restructuring of School, directed by Fred M. Newmann at the University of Wisconsin (CORS; 1990-95) and with the Chicago Annenberg Research Project (CARP; 1995-2001), located within the Consortium for Chicago School Research. She has also served in an advisory capacity on several federal policy initiatives. Her research has been published in books, journal articles, and reports. Besides her focus on U.S. schools, she has also studied school effects in Brazil, sub-Saharan Africa, and Portugal.

Hope Jensen Leichter is Elbenwood Professor of Education and director of the Elbenwood Center for the Study of the Family as Educator at Teachers College, Columbia University. She received her BA from Oberlin College and her PhD from Harvard University. Leichter has received the Fulbright Travel Grant and French government fellowship, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, and the Outstanding Professor of the Year Award of the Student Senate at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her publications include Kinship and Casework, The Family as Educator, and Families and Communities as Educators.

Henry M. Levin is the William Heard Kilpatrick Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is Director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education, a non-partisan entity www.ncspe.org and Co-Director of the Center for Benefit-Cost Studies in Education, (www.cbcse.org).  He is also the David Jacks Professor of Higher Education and Economics, Emeritus, at Stanford University where he served from 1968-99 after working as an economist at the Brookings Institution in Washington. From 1978-84 he was the Director of the Institute for Research on Educational Finance at Stanford, a federally-funded R. & D. Center. From 1986-2000 Levin served as the Director of the Accelerated Schools Project www.acceleratedschools.net , a national school reform initiative for accelerating the education of at-risk youngsters encompassing about 1,000 schools in 41 states. Levin has held Fulbright Professorships in Barcelona and Mexico and is on the Guest Faculty at Peking University and an Honorary Professor at Beijing Normal University. He has been a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and the Russell Sage Foundation. In 1992 the New York Times named him in its special issue on educational reform as one of nine national leaders in education innovation”.  Levin has been the Editor of the Review of Educational Research and the President of the American Evaluation Association and a winner of its Gunnar Myrdal Award. He is also a recipient of the Outstanding Service Award of the American Educational Finance Association and an elected member of both the National Academy of Education. He has been a member and President of the Palo Alto (CA) School Board and was President (2008-09) of the Comparative and International Education Society. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of Educational Testing Service. Levin is a specialist in the economics of education and human resources and has published 20 books and about 300 articles on these and related subjects. At present he is doing research on educational reform, educational vouchers, cost-effectiveness analysis, costs to society of inadequate education, and educational privatization, and benefit-cost studies in education. His most recent books are: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis: Methods and Applications (Sage Publications, 2001); Privatizing Education (Westview, 2001); Cost-Effectiveness and Educational Policy (Eye on Education, 2002); Readings in the Economics of Higher Education (Elgar, 2003); and Privatizing Educational Choice (Paradigm Publishers, 2005), and The Price We Pay: Economic and Social Costs of Inadequate Education (Brookings, 2007).

Richard J. Light is a professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the John F. Kennedy School of Government. His work focuses on ways to collect and analyze information to improve policy decisions. He is director of the Harvard Assessment Seminars, a consortium that brings together faculty and senior administrators from twenty-four colleges and universities to carry out research on college effectiveness. Light has been elected president of the American Evaluation Association and chaired the Panel on Youth for the National Academy of Sciences. He serves on the National Advisory Board for the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the National Board of the Fund for Improvement of Postsecondary Education, and the board of directors of the American Association for Higher Education. He was honored with the Paul Lazarsfeld Award for distinguished contributions to scientific practice and by Vanderbilt University as one of America's great teachers. He received his PhD in statistics from Harvard University. Light's books include By Design: Planning Research in Higher Education, Summing Up: The Science of Reviewing Research(with David Pillemer), and Making the Most of College: Students Speak Their Minds.  http://www.hks.harvard.edu/about/faculty-staff-directory/richard-light

Marcia C. Linn is professor of development and cognition specializing in education in mathematics, science, and technology in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science. She has served as Chair for the AAAS Education Section and as President of the International Society of the Learning Sciences. Board service includes the American Association for the Advancement of Science board, the Graduate Record Examination Board of the Educational Testing Service, the McDonnell Foundation Cognitive Studies in Education Practice board, and the Education and Human Resources Directorate at the National Science Foundation. Awards include the National Association for Research in Science Teaching Award for Lifelong Distinguished Contributions to Science Education, the American Educational Research Association: Willystine Goodsell Award, and the Council of Scientific Society Presidents first award for Excellence in Educational Research. Linn’s latest book is Science, Teaching and Learning: Taking Advantage of Technology to Promote Knowledge Integration (Routledge, 2011). http://telscenter.org/mclinn

Robert Linn is distinguished professor emeritus of education and co-director of the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has published over 225 journal articles and chapters in books dealing with a wide range of theoretical and applied issues in educational measurement. He served as editor of the third edition of Educational Measurement and as editor of the Journal of Educational Measurement. He has received several awards for his contributions to the field, including the ETS Award for Distinguished Service to Measurement, the E.L Thorndike Award, the E.F. Lindquist Award, the National Council on Measurement in Education Career Award, and the American Educational Research Association Award for Distinguished Contributions to Educational Research. He is past president of the American Educational Research Association, past president of the National Council on Measurement in Education, past president of the Evaluation and Measurement Division of the American Psychological Association, and past vice-president for the Research and Measurement Division of the American Educational Research Association. He is a Lifetime National Associate of the National Academies, and serves on two Boards of National Academy of Sciences.

Judith Warren Little is Dean and Carol Liu Professor of Education Policy at the Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley. She received her PhD in sociology from the University of Colorado and worked as Senior Program Director at Far West Laboratory (now WestEd) before joining the faculty at Berkeley. Her research focuses on teachers' work and careers, the organizational and policy contexts of teaching and teacher education. In her current research, Little is investigating the resources and interactions that support or constrain teacher learning in both formal professional development and informal workplace settings. She is also interested in international developments in the composition, quality, distribution and preparation of the teacher workforce, and in cross-field studies of education for the professions. Dr. Little has served as member and chair of the Academy’s post-doctoral selection committee, and as a member of the NAEd Education Policy White Papers Project Working Group on Teacher Quality. She is currently a member of the NAEd Boardhttp://gse.berkeley.edu/people/judith-warren-little

Susanna Loeb is the Barnett Family Professor of Education at Stanford University, faculty director of the Center for Education Policy Analysis, and a co-director of Policy Analysis for California Education. She specializes in the economics of education and the relationship between schools and federal, state and local policies. Her research addresses teacher policy, looking specifically at how teachers' preferences affect the distribution of teaching quality across schools, how pre-service coursework requirements affect the quality of teacher candidates, and how reforms affect teachers' career decisions. She also studies school leadership and school finance, for example looking at how the structure of state finance systems affects the level and distribution of resources across schools. Susanna is a member of the National Board for Education Sciences, a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, member of the Executive Board of the National Center for the Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research, and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Dan Lortie is a professor of education emeritus at the University of Chicago and director of the Midwest Administration Center. He received his BA in sociology from McGill University and his MA and PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago. 

George Madaus is Boisi Professor Emeritus at Boston College. He is currently is a research professor at the Center for the Study of Testing, Evaluation, and Educational Policy. He received his BS from the College of the Holy Cross, his ME from the State College at Worcester, and his EdD from Boston College. His publications include The Fractured Marketplace for Standardized Testing (with Walter Haney and Robert Lyons), From Gate Keeper to Gateway: Transforming Testing in the United States, and Teach Them Well: An Introduction to Education (with Thomas Kellaghan and Richard Schwab). http://www.bc.edu/research/nbetpp/about_staff.html

Kathleen McCartney is the President of Smith College. Previously, McCartney, the Gerald S. Lesser Professor in Early Childhood Development, was named Dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2006. In collaboration with a dedicated faculty and administrative team, she implemented a strategic plan that resulted in the creation of two new degree programs, the doctorate in education leadership (Ed.L.D.), and a new interfaculty Ph.D. in education; a 25 percent growth in core faculty; a doubling of financial aid for Ed.M. students; a dramatic increase in fellowship support for doctoral students; and the establishment of a partner network with over 30 districts and non-profit organizations. McCartney’s research program concerns early experience and development, and she has published more than 150 articles and chapters on child care, early childhood education, and poverty. She is a member of the NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, which summarized the results of their longitudinal study inChild Care and Child Development. She also co-edited Experience and Development, The Blackwell Handbook of Early Childhood Development, and Best Practices in Developmental Research Methods.

Lorraine McDonnell is a professor of political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Prior to coming to UCSB, she was a senior political scientist at RAND. Her research has focused on the design and implementation of K-12 education policies and their effects on school practice. In recent studies, she examined the politics of student testing, particularly the curricular and political values underlying state assessment policies. Her publications have focused on various aspects of education policy and politics, including teacher unions, the education of immigrant students, and the role of citizen deliberation. She served for seven years on the National Research Council's Board on Testing and Assessment, and is currently a member of the NRC's advisory committee for the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. She was the 2008-09 president of the American Educational Research Association.

Milbrey McLaughlin is David Jacks Professor of Education and Public Policy at Stanford University, co-director of the Center for Research on the Context of Secondary School Teaching, and executive director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities. She received her BA from Connecticut College and her EdM and EdD from Harvard University. Her books include Building Professional Learning Communities (with Joan Talbert), Professional Communities and the Work of High School Teaching (with Joan Talbert), Community Counts, and Urban Sanctuaries: Neighborhood Organizations in the Lives and Futures of Inner-City Youth.

Michael McPherson is president of the Spencer Foundation, having assumed that post in 2003. A nationally known economist whose expertise focuses on the interplay between education and economics, McPherson was previously president of Macalester College (1996-2003) and spent the twenty-two years prior to assuming the Macalester presidency as professor of economics, chairman of the economics department, and dean of faculty at Williams College. McPherson has co-authored and edited eight books, including Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America’s Public Universities, Keeping College Affordable and Economic Analysis and Moral Philosophy, and is the co-founder and co-editor of Economics and Philosophy. He has served as a trustee of the College Board and the American Council on Education. He was a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. McPherson holds a BA in mathematics, a MA in economics, and a PhD in economics, all from the University of Chicago.

Douglas Medin (Ph.D., University of South Dakota) taught at The Rockefeller University, University of Illinois, and the University of Michigan before assuming his current position as Professor of Psychology and Professor of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. Best known for his research on concepts and categorization, his recent research interests have focused on culture and cognition in general and the role of culture and experience in children's development of biological concepts in particular. This latter work has led to studies of culturally- and community-based science education with Native American children. He teaches courses in decision making, culture and cognition, and non-laboratory research methods. He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Hugh Mehan is a professor emeritus of sociology and founding director of the Center for Research on Educational Equity and Teaching Excellence at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). He received his BA from Hobart College, his MA from San Jose State College, and his PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Mehan has received the UCSD Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award, the British Council–Fulbright Commission’s Higher Education Link, and numerous research grants. His publications include The Reality of Ethnomethodology, Learning Lessons, Handicapping the Handicapped,Constructing School Success, Extending Educational Reform, and Reform as Learning: School Reform, Organizational Culture, and Community Politics in San Diego (with Lea Hubbard and Mary Kay Stein). His most recent book In the Front Door: Building a college-going Culture of Learning describes the organizational practices that propel low-income students toward 4-year college enrollment.

Deborah Meier is currently senior scholar at New York University's Steinhardt School of Education. She began working in the field of education in the mid-60s as a kindergarten and Head Start teacher, and went on to be the founder and principal of a network of renowned East Harlem public schools (Central Park East schools) and the Mission Hill School in Boston, also a public school. These schools were an inspiration to many of the early K-12 small schools in our urban centers. Her books about these schools and issues of urban education include: The Power of Their Ideas, In Schools We Trust, Keeping School (with Ted and Nancy Sizer,), Many Children Left Behind (edited with George Wood), and Playing for Keeps (with Brenda Engel and Beth Taylor). She attended Antioch College and received her MA in History from the University of Chicago. She received a MacArthur Fellowship for her work in education in 1987. http://www.deborahmeier.com

John W. Meyer is Professor of Sociology, emeritus, at Stanford. He has contributed to organizational theory, comparative education, and the sociology of education, developing sociological institutional theory. Since the 1970’s, he has studied the impact of global society on national states and societies (some papers are collected in Weltkultur: Wie die westlichen Prinzipien die Welt durchdringen, Suhrkamp, 2005; a more extensive set is in G. Kruecken and G. Drori, eds.: World Society: The Writings of John W. Meyer, Oxford, 2009). In 2003 he completed a collaborative study of worldwide science and its national effects (Drori, et al., Science in the Modern World Polity, Stanford). A more recent collaborative project is on the impact of globalization on organizational structures (Drori, et al., eds., Globalization and Organization, Oxford, 2006). He now studies the world human rights regime, and world curricula in mass and higher education. He has honorary doctorates from the Stockholm School of Economics and the Universities of Bielefeld and Lucerne, and received the American Sociological Association’s awards for lifetime contributions to the sociology of education, and to the study of globalization.

Robert Mislevy holds the Frederic M. Lord Chair in Measurement and Statistics at Educational Testing Service. He was previously at the University of Maryland as a Professor of Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation (EDMS). He was also an Affiliate Professor of Second Language Acquisition and the Joint Program in Survey Methods. He was previously a Distinguished Research Scientist at ETS and a Research Associate at National Opinion Research Center. He earned his Ph.D. in Methodology of Behavioral Research at the University of Chicago in 1981. Dr. Mislevy's research interests center on applying recent developments in statistical methodology and cognitive research to practical problems in educational and psychological measurement. His work has included a multiple-imputation approach for integrating sampling and test-theoretic models in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), a Bayesian inference network for updating the student model in an intelligent tutoring system, and a demonstration of a framework for monitoring and improving portfolio assessment evaluation (in the context of the Advanced Placement Studio Art Portfolio assessment). His current projects include the NSF-supported PADI project, which is developing an assessment design system with a focus on science inquiry, and work with the Cisco Learning Institute and Educational Testing Service on simulation-based assessments of design and troubleshooting of computer networks. Among his honors and awards are the American Educational Research Association's Raymond B. Cattell Early Career Award for Programmatic Research, the National Council of Measurement in Education's Award for Technical Contributions to Educational Measurement (three times), the ETS Senior Research Scientist Award, AERA’s Lindquist Award and the International Language Testing Association's Samuel J. Messick Memorial Lecture Award. In 1992, he was elected president of the Psychometric Society. In 2003, he was presented the National Council of Measurement's Award for Career Contributions to Educational Measurement. He has served several committees of the National Research Council on issues concerning assessment, instruction, and cognitive psychology, and was a primary author of final report of the National Assessment Governing Board's Design Feasibility Team.

Elizabeth Moje is the associate dean for research and community engagement and an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in the School of Education at the University of Michigan. She also serves as a faculty associate in the university’s Institute for Social Research, in Latino/a Studies, and in the Joint Program in English and Education. Moje teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in secondary and adolescent literacy, literacy and cultural theory, and qualitative and mixed research methods. Her research interests revolve around the intersection between the literacies youth are asked to learn in the disciplines (particularly in science and social studies) and the literacies they experience outside of school. In addition, Moje studies how youth make culture and enact identities from their home and community literacies, and from ethnic cultures, popular cultures, and school cultures. Her current research focuses on communities and schools in Detroit, Michigan.

In her current research and community engagement work, funded by foundations and federal agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, William T. Grant Foundation, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation, Moje uses an array of methods to study and support young people’s disciplinary literacy learning. In related work focused on teacher learning, which has been funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and by Excellent Schools Detroit, Moje has developed Teaching and Learning the Disciplines through Clinical Practice Rounds, with colleague Robert Bain. The Rounds Project advances discipline-based adolescent literacy teacher education. Moje and Bain were awarded the provost’s Teaching Innovation Prize at the University of Michigan in 2010 for the project. http://www.umich.edu/~moje

Luis C. Mollborn in Puerto Rico, was awarded his Ph.D. (1978) from the University of California, Los Angeles in educational psychology/early childhood development. He was an Assistant Research Psychologist at the Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition of the University of California, San Diego from 1978-1986. He is currently Professor in the Department of Language, Reading and Culture of the College of Education at The University of Arizona. He served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the College of Education from 2004-2007. His main research interest is the connection among culture, psychology and education, especially as it relates to the education of Latino children in the US. Among other studies, he has analyzed the quality of classroom teaching, examined literacy instruction in English and Spanish, studied how knowledge is produced in the broader social contexts of household and community life, and attempted to establish pedagogical relationships among these domains of study. His most recent work involves the longitudinal study of biliteracy development in children, and the use of new technologies to facilitate the informal learning of science in community settings. His co-edited volume, Funds of knowledge: Theorizing practices in households, communities, and classrooms,” was published in 2005 by Erlbaum Press, and received the 2006 Critics’ Choice Award of the American Educational Studies Association. He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Education in 1998.

Richard Murnane, an economist, is Thompson Professor of Education and Society at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. In recent years, he has pursued three lines of research. With MIT Professors Frank Levy and David Autor, he has examined how computer-based technological change has affected skill demands in the U.S. economy. Murnane and Levy have written two books on this topic. The second line of research examines how increases in family income inequality in the U.S. have influenced educational opportunities for children from low-income families. Murnane and Greg Duncan have co-edited a volume describing four years of research on this topic. The volume, Whither OpportunityRising Inequality, Schools, and Children’s Life Chances, will be published in September 2011. The third area of research examines the consequences of particular initiatives designed to improve the performance of the education sector. For example, along with HGSE colleagues, Murnane has examined the consequences of providing salary bonuses to attract skilled teachers to high-need schools and the impact that exit examination requirements have on the probability that economically disadvantaged students graduate from high school. Murnane and his colleague, John Willett, recently published a book, Methods Matter: Improving Causal Inference in Educational and Social Science Research (Oxford U. Press, 2011). http://www.gse.harvard.edu/directory/faculty/faculty-detail/?fc=321&flt=m&sub=all

Anna Neumann's  research and teaching interests include the pedagogies of liberal education, teaching and learning in urban colleges and universities serving first-generation learners, professors and their intellectual careers, qualitative research strategies and methods, and doctoral students' learning of research and development as researchers. Her recent book, Professing to Learn: Creating Tenured Lives and Careers in the American Research University (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), analyzes the scholarly learning and development of 78 early midcareer professors in diverse disciplines and fields and working at five major American research universities. Recent writings have focused on liberal education and culturally relevant pedagogies; professors' learning in their teaching, research, and service; cognition and learning in higher education organizations; aesthetic dimensions of scholarly learning; and doctoral students' learning of research in education and the social sciences. Neumann has been named a Fellow of the American Education Research Association and is a recipient of the AERA Division J Exemplary Research Award presented to scholars “whose published research has made an outstanding contribution to knowledge and understanding in the field of higher education.” A past president of the Association for the Study of Higher Education, Neumann directs the Program in Higher and Postsecondary Education and chairs the Department of Organization and Leadership at Teachers College, Columbia University.

Nel Noddings is Lee Jacks Professor of Child Education emerita at Stanford University. She received her BA from Montclair State College, her MA from Rutgers University, and her PhD from Stanford University. Noddings has received the Medal for Distinguished Service from Teachers College, Columbia University; the Anne Roe Award for Contributions to the Professional Development of Women from Harvard University; the Willystine Goodsell Award from the American Educational Research Association; and five honorary doctorates. Her publications include Philosophy of EducationEducating for Intelligent Belief or Unbelief,Caring: A Feminine Approach to Ethics and Moral Education, The Challenge to Care in Schools, Educating Moral PeopleStarting at Home: Caring and Social PolicyHappiness and Education, Critical Lessons: What Our Schools Should Teach, When School Reform Goes Wrong, The Maternal Factor: Two Paths to MoralityPeace Education: How We Came to Love and Hate War, and Education and Democracy in the 21st Century.

Pedro Noguera is the Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education at New York University. Dr. Noguera is a sociologist whose scholarship and research focuses on the ways in which schools are influenced by social and economic conditions, as well as by demographic trends in local, regional and global contexts. Dr. Noguera holds faculty appointments in the departments of Teaching and Learning and Humanities and Social Sciences at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Development. He also serves as an affiliated faculty member in NYU's Department of Sociology. Dr. Noguera is the Executive Director of the Metropolitan Center for Urban Education and the co-Director of the Institute for the Study of Globalization and Education in Metropolitan Settings (IGEMS). From 2008 -2011, he was an appointee of the Governor of New York to the State University of New York (SUNY) Board of Trustees. Dr. Noguera received his bachelors' degree in Sociology and History and a teaching credential from Brown University in 1981 and earned his masters' degree in Sociology from Brown in 1982. Dr. Noguera earned his doctorate in Sociology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1989. He was a classroom teacher in public schools in Providence, RI and Oakland, CA and continues to work with schools nationally and internationally as a researcher and advisor. He has held tenured faculty appointments at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (2000-2003), where he was named the Judith K. Dimon Professor of Communities and Schools and at the University of California, Berkeley (1990-2000), where he was also the Director of the Institute for the Study of Social Change.

Jeannie Oakes is the Director of Education and Scholarship at the Ford Foundation. Previously she was the Presidential Professor in educational equity and director of the University of California, Los Angeles' (UCLA) Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access (IDEA) and the University of California's All Campus Consortium on Research for Diversity (ACCORD). Specifically, her work addresses tracking and ability grouping, unequal distribution of resources and opportunities for education, and research on educators who are attempting to eliminate schooling inequalities. Oakes’ books include Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality (first edition published in 1985 and second edition in 2005),Becoming Good American Schools: The Struggle for Civic Virtue in Education Reform (with UCLA colleagues); and Learning Power: Organizing for Education and Justice (with UCLA colleagues). Oakes' awards include three major awards from the American Educational Research Association (Early Career Award, Outstanding Research Article, Outstanding Book), the National Association for Multicultural Education's Multicultural Research Award, and the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Educational Press Association of America. She is the recipient of Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Ralph David Abernathy Award for Public Service and the World Cultural Council's Jose Vasconcelos World Award in Education. In 2012, she was awarded AERA's Social Justice in Educational Research Award.  http://www.fordfoundation.org/about-us/grant-maker/jeannie-oakes/

Michael A. Olivas is William B. Bates Distinguished Chair of Law at the University of Houston and the director of the Institute for Higher Education Law and Governance. Olivas joined the faculty of the University of Houston in 1982. During his tenure at Houston he has been a visiting professor of law at the University of Wisconsin (UW) and special counsel to UW Chancellor Donna Shalala from 1989-1990. Prior to 1982 he held teaching and research positions at Ohio State University and Howard University, and he served as director of research for the League of United Latin American Citizens in Washington, DC, from 1979-1982. He has received a Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Educational Research Association and the Research Achievement Award from the Association for the Study of Higher Education, and was appointed a Fellow of the National Association of College and University Attorneys. He is an elected member of the American Law Institute. He served two terms as General Counsel to the AAUP. Olivas has earned recognition for his promotion of educational and social equity, including helping undocumented immigrants obtain access to Texas colleges and universities. He received his PhD from Ohio State University and his JD from Georgetown University. His books include The Law and Higher EducationSuing Alma Mater, No Undocumented Child Left Behind, Colored Men and Hombres Aqui, and Prepaid College Tuition Programs: Promises and Problems. He is the President of the Association of American Law Schools. http://www.law.uh.edu/faculty/main.asp?PID=31

Gary Orfield is Professor of Education, Law, Political Science and Urban Planning at the University of California-Los Angeles, and Professor of Education and Social Policy at Harvard University during the transition of the Civil Rights Project to UCLA. Professor Orfield is interested in the study of civil rights, education policy, urban policy, and minority opportunity. He has been Director of the Civil Rights Project at Harvard, an initiative that develops and published a new generation of research on multicultural civil rights issues. At UCLA, The Civil Rights Project/El Proyecto de CRP will add more emphasis on issues of immigration and language and more focus on California and the Southwest to its long-standing work and a new co-director, Patricia Gandara. Orfield’s central interest has been the development and implementation of social policy, with a central focus on impact of policy on equal opportunity for success in American society. Recent works include five co-edited books over the last two years and numerous articles and reports. Recent books include, Dropouts in America: Confronting the Graduation Rate CrisisSchool Resegregation: Must the South Turn Back?(with John Boger), and Higher Education and the Color Line (with Patricia Marin and Catherine Horn). In addition to his scholarly work, Orfield has been involved in the development of governmental policy and has served as an expert witness in several dozen court cases related to his research, including the University of Michigan Supreme Court case which upheld the policy of affirmative action in 2003 and has been called to give testimony in civil rights suits by the United State Department of Justice and many civil rights, legal services, and educational organizations. He was awarded the American Political Science Association’s Charles Merriam Award for his contribution to the art of government through the application of social science research.” He has been awarded the 2007 Social Justice in Education Award by the American Educational Research Association. A native Minnesotan, Orfield received his PhD from the University of Chicago and travels annually to Latin America, where his research work is now expanding.

Annemarie Sullivan Palincsar is the Jean and Charles Walgreen Jr. Chair of Reading and Literacy, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, and a teacher educator in Literacy, Language, and Culture at the University of Michigan. She began her career as a public school teacher working with children with special needs in grades K-7. Her research focuses on the design of learning environments that support self-regulation in learning activity, especially for children who experience difficulty learning in school; she has studied how children use literacy in the context of guided inquiry science instruction, what types of text support children's inquiry, and what support students who are identified as atypical learners require to be successful in this instruction. She has investigated the use of a hypermedia tool (called EASE-C) to support bringing-to-scale knowledge and practice regarding text comprehension instruction. She has studied the role of computer-assisted instruction in enhancing children's understanding of subject matter text and web-based text. She is currently investigating the design and use of educative supports for guided inquiry science teaching in the elementary grades (with E. Davis and S. Smith, funded by NSF), and the use of functional grammar analysis to enhance the literacy learning of English Language Learners (with M. Schleppegrell, funded by IES). Annemarie has served as a member of: the National Academy’s Research Council on the Prevention of Reading Difficulty in Young Children; the OERI/RAND Reading Study Group, the National Research Council’s Panel on Teacher Preparation, The National Education Goals Panel, and the National Advisory Board to Children's Television Workshop. She was recently co-editor of the journal Cognition and Instruction. She completed her doctorate at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.

 Roy Pea is a professor of education and learning sciences at Stanford University, and director of the Stanford Center for Innovations in Learning and the co-director of Stanford’s H-STAR Institute (Human Services and Technologies Advanced Research).  Prior to teaching at Stanford, Pea was director of the Center for Technology and Learning at SRI International from 1996-2001, and dean of the School of Education and Social Policy and the John Evans Professor of Education and the Learning Sciences at Northwestern University from 1991-1996. Pea’s research has centered on how innovations in computing and communications technologies can influence learning, thinking, collaboration, and educational systems, and most recently has been focusing on bridging the sciences of informal and formal learning. He received his doctorate from Oxford University where he studied developmental psychology and psycholinguistics as a Rhodes Scholar. Pea is a co-editor of the new LEA volume Video Research in the Learning Sciences, and is a co-author of How People Learn: Mind, Brain, Experience and School.  He is a co-founder and director of Teachscape.com.
http://www.stanford.edu/~roypea/ 
http://scil.stanford.edu

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 P. David Pearson served as dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley, were he is a faculty member in the language and literacy program. His current research focuses on issues of reading instruction and reading assessment policies and practices at all levels-local, state, and national; most notable is a decade-long line of inquiry into to synergies between science and literacy practices. Prior to going to Berkeley in 2001, he was the John A. Hannah Distinguished Professor of Education in the College of Education at Michigan State University (MSU) and a co-director of the Center for the Improvement of Early Reading Achievement (CIERA) at MSU, with faculty appointments in teacher education and educational psychology. Prior to that, he was dean of the College of Education, co-director of the Center for the Study of Reading, and professor of curriculum and instruction at the University of Illinois. He has written and co-edited several books about research and practice, the most notable being the Handbook of Reading Research, now in its fourth volume. Pearson's honors include the Oscar Causey Award for outstanding contributions to reading research from the National Reading Conference and the William S. Gray Citation of Merit by the International Reading Association for his contributions to theory, research, and practice. In 2009, he became an AERA Fellow, and in 2010, he was presented the AERA Distinguished Contributions to Education Award. His articles have been awarded IRA's Albert Harris Award for contributions to studies of reading difficulties and NCTE's Alan Purves Award for impact on practice. In 2006, his doctoral alma mater, the University of Minnesota, presented him with the University's Outstanding Alumnus Award. In 2012, the Literacy Research Association established the P. David Pearson Scholarly Influence Award to honor research that has a positive and substantial impact on literacy practice.

James W. Pellegrino is Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Psychology and Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He also serves as co-director of UIC's interdisciplinary Learning Sciences Research Institute. From 1973-1979 he was Professor of Psychology and a Research Associate of the University of Pittsburgh's Learning Research and Development Center. From 1979-1989 he was Professor of Education and Psychology at the University of California at Santa Barbara where he also served as Chair of the Department of Education from 1987-1989. From 1989-2001 he was the Frank W. Mayborn Professor of Cognitive Studies at Vanderbilt University where he also served as co-director of the Learning Technology Center from 1989-1991 and as Dean of Vanderbilt's Peabody College of Education and Human Development from 1992-1998. Dr. Pellegrino's research and development interests focus on children's and adult's thinking and learning and the implications of cognitive research and theory for assessment and instructional practice. Much of his current work is focused on analyses of complex learning and instructional environments, including those incorporating powerful information technology tools, with the goal of better understanding the nature of student learning and the conditions that enhance deep understanding. A special concern of his research is the incorporation of effective formative assessment practices, assisted by technology, to maximize student learning and understanding. Dr. Pellegrino has served as head of several National Academy of Science/National Research Council study committees. These include chair of the Study Committee for the Evaluation of the National and State Assessments of Educational Progress, co-chair of the NRC/NAS Study Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice, and co-chair of the NRC/NAS Study Committee on the Foundations of Assessment which issued the report Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Educational Assessment. He was a member of the NRC/NAS/NAE Study Committee on Improving Learning with Information Technology and chaired the NRC/NAS Panel on Research on Learning and Instruction for the Strategic Education Research Partnership. He recently completed service as a member of the NRC/NAS Study Committee on Test Design for K-12 Science Achievement. He is a lifetime National Associate of the National Academy of Sciences and a member of the Board on Testing and Assessment of the National Research Council. Dr. Pellegrino has supervised several large-scale research and development projects funded by agencies such as NSF, IES, ONR, AFOSR, NIH, and private foundations. He has authored or co-authored over 225 books, chapters and journal articles in the areas of cognition, instruction and assessment and has made numerous invited presentations at local, state, national and international meetings and at universities throughout the world.

David Perkins is a Research Professor, retired from the Senior Faculty at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a founding member of Project Zero, co-director for many years, and now senior co-director and member of the steering committee. Project Zero, founded in 1967, is a research and development group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education investigating human intelligence, creativity, understanding, and learning at all levels. David Perkins conducts research on creativity in the arts and sciences, informal reasoning, problem solving, understanding, individual and organizational learning, and the teaching of thinking skills. He has participated in curriculum projects addressing thinking, understanding, and learning in Colombia, Israel, Venezuela, South Africa, Sweden, and Australia as well as in the United States. He is actively involved in school change. Perkins is a cofounder of the WIDE World Initiative, a distance learning initiative for practitioners. He is the author of numerous publications, including Smart Schools (The Free Press, 1992),Outstanding IQ (The Free Press, 1995) on intelligence and its cultivation, The Eureka Effect(Norton, 2001) about creative thinking and King Arthur’s Round Table (Wiley, 2003) about organizational intelligence and learning, and Making Learning Whole (Jossey-Bass, in press) about organizing learning around full meaningful endeavors.

Paul Peterson is Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Government at Harvard University, Director of the Program on Education Policy and Governance, and Editor-in-Chief ofEducation Next: A Journal of Opinion and Research. He received his BA from Concordia College and his MA and PhD from the University of Chicago. Peterson has received the American Political Science Association’s Gladys Kammerer Award and its Martha Derthick Best Book Award, the Woodrow Wilson Prize, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, and the Russell Sage Foundation fellowship. His publications include The Price of Federalism, School Politics Chicago Style, City Limits, The Education Gap: Vouchers and Urban Schools, and Saving Schools: From Horace Mann to Virtual Learning. http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/%7Epepeters/index.htm

Prior to her appointment as Dean, Northwestern University, in September 1997, Penelope Peterson served as University Distinguished Professor of Education at Michigan State University and Sears-Bascom Professor of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Under Peterson’s leadership, SESP has moved up from a rank of 20 by U.S. News and World Reports to being ranked consistently among the top ten schools of education nationally. Peterson's books include Restructuring in the Classroom: Teaching, Learning, and School Organization (with Richard Elmore and Sarah McCarthey) and Learning from Our Lives: Women, Research, and Autobiography in Education (with Anna Neumann). Peterson is past president of the American Educational Research Association. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and the American Educational Research Association. She is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Adler Planetarium in Chicago. Recently she co-edited (with Eva Baker and Barry McGaw) the International Encyclopedia of Education, Third Edition, which incorporates eight volumes. In addition to her role as dean, Peterson co-teaches with Andrew Ortony the beginning course in the Learning Sciences graduate program, and she directs the undergraduate Honors Program in the School of Education and Social Policy.

Trained as a statistician/psychometrician, Andrew C. Porter is George and Diane Weiss Professor of Education and Dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. Currently, his work is supported by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education, the Gates Foundation, and three grants from the Institute for Education Sciences. His research on teacher decision-making created the Surveys of Enacted Curriculum (SEC) tools for measuring content and content alignment as well as teacher log procedures. His evaluation of the Eisenhower program identified characteristics of effective professional development in math and science. He is senior author of the VAL-ED assessment of school leadership. His work in the IES center on middle school science curriculum developed an algorithm for building achievement tests maximally aligned to a target such as a curriculum or content standards. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Education, member of the National Assessment Governing Board, Lifetime National Associate of the National Academies, and past-President of the American Educational Research Association. www.andyporter.orgwww.gse.upenn.edu/faculty/porter

Stephen W. Raudenbush, EdD, joined the University of Chicago as the Lewis-Sebring Distinguished Service Professor and chair of the new Committee on Education. Professor Raudenbush is best known for his expertise in quantitative methodology using the advanced research technique of hierarchical linear models, which allows researchers to accurately evaluate data from school performance. His research pursues the development, testing, refinement, and application of statistical methods for individual change. He also researches the effects of social settings, such as schools and neighborhoods. Professor Raudenbush’s research involves the development, testing, refinement, and application of statistical methods for studying individual change and the effects of social settings such as schools, and neighborhoods on change. He is also interested in measuring the social organization of neighborhoods, schools, and classrooms. Evaluation of the reliability and validity of assessments of these social settings borrows from and extends tools from psychometrics, as explained in recent articles in Science, Sociological Methodology, and The American Journal of Sociology. Professor Raudenbush has co-authored a series of articles inPsychological Methods on the design of multilevel and longitudinal experiments. His book with Anthony S. Bryk, Hierarchical Linear Models: 2nd Edition (2002), provides an authoritative account of analytic methods for multilevel data.

Diane Ravitch is research professor of education at New York University. She received her BA from Wellesley College and her PhD from Columbia University. She has received ten honorary degrees. She received the Daniel Patrick Moynihan Award from the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences in 2010. Her publications include The Great School Wars, The Troubled Crusade, Left Back, The Death and Life of the Great American School System, and Reign of Error. She was assistant secretary of education in the U.S. Department of Education from 1991 to 1993. She was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution from 1993-2012. Keep up to date on my blog at dianeravitch.net, which has received more than 9 million page views!

Sean Reardon is professor of education and (by courtesy) sociology at Stanford University, specializing in research on the effects of educational policy on educational and social inequality, on the causes, patterns, trends, and consequences of social and educational inequality, and in applied statistical methods for educational research. His primary research examines the relative contribution of family, school, and neighborhood environments to racial/ethnic and socioeconomic achievement disparities. In addition, he develops methods of measuring social and educational inequality (including the measurement of segregation and achievement gaps) and methods of causal inference in educational and social science research. He teaches graduate courses in applied statistical methods, with a particular emphasis on the application of experimental and quasi-experimental methods to the investigation of issues of educational policy and practice. Sean received his doctorate in education in 1997 from Harvard University. He has been a recipient of a William T. Grant Foundation Scholar Award, a Carnegie Scholar Award, and a National Academy of Education Postdoctoral Fellowship.
http://cepa.stanford.edu/sean-reardon

William J. Reese is the Carl F. Kaestle WARF professor of educational policy studies and history at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He has served as president of the History of Education Society, vice president of the History and Historiography Division of the American Educational Research Association, and editor of the History of Education Quarterly. His books include Power and the Promise of School Reform: Grassroots Movements during the Progressive Era, The Origins of the American High School, America's Public Schools: From the Common School to 'No Child Left Behind’, and History, Education, and the Schools. His most recent book is Testing Wars in the Public Schools: A Forgotten History.

Lauren Resnick is a professor of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh and director and senior scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center there. She received her AB from Radcliffe College and her AM and EdD from Harvard University. Resnick has received many awards, including the Award for Distinguished Contribution to the Field of Education from the American Educational Research Association and the Oeuvre Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Science of Learning and Instruction from the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction. She has had fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Psychological Association. Her publications include Education and Learning to Think and Knowing, Learning, and Instruction.

Barbara Rogoff is currently UC Santa Cruz Foundation Professor of Psychology. She received the 2013 Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to Cultural and Contextual Factors in Child Development, from the Society for Research in Child Development. She is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the American Anthropological Association, the American Psychological Association, and the American Educational Research Association. Barbara Rogoff has been a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences twice, a Kellogg Fellow, a Spencer Fellow, and an Osher Fellow of the Exploratorium. She has served as Editor of Human Development and of the Newsletter of the Society for Research in Child Development, Study Section member for the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and a committee member on the Science of Learning for the National Academy of Science.

Her book Apprenticeship in Thinking (1990) received the Scribner Award from the American Educational Research Association; Learning Together: Children and Adults in a School Community (2004) was finalist for the Maccoby Award of the American Psychologist Association; and The Cultural Nature of Human Development (2003) won the William James Book Award of the American Psychological Association. Her most recent book is receiving the 2014 Eleanor Maccoby Book Award, from the American Psychological Association, Division 7 (Developmental Psychology), Destiny and Development: A Mayan Midwife and Town(2011, Oxford).
http://people.ucsc.edu/~brogoff/

Mike Rose Over the last forty years, he has taught in a range of educational settings, from kindergarten to job training and adult literacy programs. He is currently on the faculty of the Social Research Methodology Division of the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. Rose has written a number of books and articles on language, literacy, and cognition and has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Grawemeyer Award in Education, and the Commonwealth Club of California Award for Literary Excellence in Nonfiction. He has also been honored by the Spencer Foundation, the McDonnell Foundation Program in Cognitive Studies for Educational Practice, the National Council of Teachers of English, the Modern Language Association, the American Educational Research Association, and the National Academy of Education. He is the author of twelve books including Lives on the Boundary: the Struggles and Achievements of America’s Underprepared, Possible Lives: The Promise of Public Education in America, The Mind at Work: Valuing the Intelligence of the American Worker, An Open Language: Selected Writing on Literacy, Learning, and Opportunity, Why School?: Reclaiming Education for All of Us, and, Back to School: Why Everyone Deserves a Second Chance at Education.http://www.mikerosebooks.com

Sheldon Rothblatt is professor emeritus of history at the University of California (UC), Berkeley. He was formerly chair of the department of history and director of the Center for Studies in Higher Education at Berkeley. He was educated at UC Berkeley and King’s College, Cambridge University. He holds an honorary doctorate from Gothenburg University in Sweden. Rothblatt has received Guggenheim, American Council of Learned Societies, and Social Science Research fellowships; has been a Davis fellow at Princeton University and a visitor at Nuffield College, Oxford University; and has held visiting professorships in Austria, Sweden, Norway, and Australia. He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society of Britain and in 2001 he was named a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. He received the History of Education Society Biennial Prize for the best essay in educational history published in an English language journal. In 2010 he was named Commander of the Royal Order of the Polar Star (1748), Sweden’s highest honor to foreigners. He gave the Sir Douglas Robb Lectures for 2008 at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. His publications include The Revolution of the Dons: Cambridge and Society in Victorian England, Tradition and Change in English Liberal Education, The Modern University and Its Discontents: The Fate of Newman’s Legacies in Britain and America and Education’s Abiding Moral Dilemma: Merit and Worth in the Cross-Atlantic Democracies, 1800-2006.

Cecilia E. Rouse’s primary research and teaching interests are in labor economics with a particular focus on the economics of education. She has studied the economic benefit of community college attendance, evaluated the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program, examined the effects of education inputs on student achievement, tested for the existence of discrimination in symphony orchestras, studied unions in South Africa, and estimated the effect of financial aid on college matriculation and student occupational choice and the effectiveness of technology-based programs in public schools. Her current research evaluates Florida’s school accountability and voucher programs. In addition, she is currently studying the effect of performance-based scholarships on post-secondary student time use. Rouse has served as an editor of the Journal of Labor Economics and is currently a senior editor ofThe Future of Children (a Princeton-Brooking publication). She is the founding director of the Princeton University Education Research Section. She was formerly a director of the Industrial Relations Section and a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on the Transition to Adulthood. In 1998-99 she served a year in the White House at the National Economic Council and from 2009-2011 served as a member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Brian Rowan is the Burke A. Hinsdale Collegiate Professor in Education, a Research Professor at the Institute for Social Research, and (by courtesy) a Professor of Sociology at the University Michigan. A sociologist by training (Ph.D., Stanford, 1978), Rowan’s scholarly interests lie at the intersection of organization theory and school effectiveness research. Over the years, he has written on education as an institution, on the nature of teachers’ work, and on the effects of school organization, leadership, and instruction on student achievement. Current projects include a descriptive study of reading instruction in elementary schools, field studies on the measurement of teaching, and studies of instructional interventions in American high schools. With Heinz D. Meyer, he recently co-edited The New Institutionalism in Education. http://www.soe.umich.edu/people/profile/brian_rowan/

Robert Rueda is the Stephen H. Crocker Professor in Education at the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, where he teaches in the area of Psychology in Education. He also has a courtesy appointment in the Psychological Department. His research has entered on the sociocultural basis of motivation, learning, and instruction, with a focus reading and literacy in English learners, and students in at-risk conditions, and he teaches courses in learning and motivation. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and of the American Educational Research Association, and also a member of the International Society for Cultural Research and Activity Theory, the Council for Exceptional Children (Mental Retardation Division; Learning Disabilities Division; Division for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Learners), the International Reading Association, the California Reading Association, and the National Reading Conference.http://rsrueda.wordpress.com/

Rubén G. Rumbaut is professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine, where he is also formally affiliated with its School of Education. In the 1980s he conducted several of the principal studies of the postwar resettlement of refugees from Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, and of their children’s adaptations in San Diego public schools. Subsequent studies into the 1990s examined the educational achievement of immigrant students and LEP/FEP language minorities in California. Beginning in 1991 he co-directed the landmark Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study, which has followed the trajectories into adulthood of thousands of youth representing dozens of different nationalities, primarily from Latin America and Asia. That study has generated numerous publications, including Legacies: The Story of the Immigrant Second Generation (with Alejandro Portes), which won the Distinguished Scholarship Award of the American Sociological Association and the Thomas and Znaniecki Award for best book in the immigration field, and was nominated for the Grawemeyer award in education. Since 2002 he has been involved in comparative research on transitions to adulthood with multiethnic samples in San Diego and other field sites across the United States; and co-directed the Immigration and Intergenerational Mobility in Metropolitan Los Angeles study, comparing the educational and socioeconomic progress of 1.5 and second-generation young adults with native-parentage white, African American, and Mexican American peers. As a member of a panel of the National Academy of Sciences, he worked on two authoritative volumes on the Hispanic population of the United States. He is currently involved in a longitudinal study of educational achievement and adult transitions of youth from the same hometown in Mexico, comparing those who stayed and those who immigrated to California. Among his other books are Immigrant America: A Portrait (with Alejandro Portes); Ethnicities: Children of Immigrants in America (also with Portes); On the Frontier of Adulthood: Theory, Research, and Public Policy (with Richard Settersten and Frank Furstenberg); Immigration Research for a New Century: Multidisciplinary Perspectives (with Nancy Foner and Steven J. Gold); and California’s Immigrant Children: Theory, Research, and Implications for Educational Policy (with Wayne Cornelius).http://www.faculty.uci.edu/profile.cfm?faculty_id=4999

Geoffrey B. Saxe is a professor in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB).  Since receiving his PhD in psychology from UCB in 1975, he has held postdoctoral and faculty positions at Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School (1976-1977), the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (1977-1981), and the University of California, Los Angeles (1981-1997). He has published widely in areas of culture and cognitive development. His research has been set in varied contexts, including classroom and home settings in the United States, remote areas in Papua New Guinea, and urban and rural Brazil. He has served on various standing committees and task forces and review panels for private and public foundations, including the MacArthur Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Office of Educational Research and Improvement, the RAND Corporation, and the National Institutes of Mental Health. He is former editor-in-chief of the journal Human Development and has served on the editorial boards for various journals, including Cognition and Instruction, Cognitive Development, and the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology. He was a recent fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and is a former Fulbright Fellow at the Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil. He serves on the advisory board of the Glen Lean Ethnomathematics Centre at the University of Goroka in Papua, New Guinea. His books and monographs include Social Processes in Early Number Development (with Steven R. Guberman and Maryl Gearhart), Culture and Cognitive Development: Studies in Mathematical Understanding, and Studying Cognition in Flux (with Indigo Esmonde). http://gse.berkeley.edu/people/geoffrey-saxe

Marlene Scardamalia is a professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, and director of the Centre for Applied Cognitive Science. She received her BA from Clarion State College, her MS from Bucknell University, and her PhD from the University of Toronto. Scardamalia has received the Ontario Psychological Foundation Contribution to Knowledge Award, the National Defense Education Fellowship, and a fellowship from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Her publications include The Psychology of Written Composition and Surpassing Ourselves: An Inquiry into the Nature and Implications of Expertise (both with Carl Bereiter) and Writing for Results(with Bereiter and Bryant Fillion).

William H. Schmidt received his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Concordia College in River Forrest, IL and his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in psychometrics and applied statistics. He carries the title of University Distinguished Professor at Michigan State University and is currently co director of the Education Policy Center. Previously he served as National Research Coordinator and Executive Director of the US National Center which oversaw participation of the United States in the IEA sponsored Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). He has published in numerous journals including the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Journal of Educational Statistics, and the Journal of Educational Measurement. He has co-authored seven books including Why Schools Matter and Inequality for all. His current writing and research concerns issues of academic content inK-12 schooling, assessment theory and the effects of curriculum on academic achievement. He is also concerned with educational policy related to mathematics, science and testing in general. He was awarded the Honorary Doctorate Degree at Concordia University in 1997 and received the 1998 Willard Jacobson Lectureship from The New York Academy of Sciences, a member of the National Academy of Education, and a Founding Fellow of AERA.

Alan Schoenfeld is Elizabeth and Edward Conner Professor of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. Schoenfeld is past president of the American Educational Research Association and past vice president of the National Academy of Education; he is a Fellow of The American Association for The Advancement of Science and of AERA, and a Laureate of Kappa Delta Pi. In 2011 he was awarded the International Commission on Mathematics Instruction's Klein Medal, the highest international distinction in mathematics education. In 2013 he was awarded AERA's Distinguished Contributions to Research in Education award, AERA's premier acknowledgement of achievement in education research. Schoenfeld's interests are in teaching and learning, with an emphasis on mathematics. He received his BA from Queens College and his MS and PhD from Stanford University. Books he has written include Mathematical Problem Solving and How We Think: A Theory of Goal-Oriented Decision Making and its Educational Applications, which explains and models people's in-the-moment decision making. http://gse.berkeley.edu/people/alan-schoenfeld

Robert Schwartz is the Professor of Practice Emeritus in Educational Policy and Administration at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. From 2006-2011 he served as the School’s Academic Dean. From 1997-2002 while a faculty member he also served as the first president of Achieve, Inc., a national non-profit established by a bipartisan group of governors and corporate leaders to help states strengthen academic performance. He previously played a variety of roles in education and government, including high school teacher in California and principal in Oregon; education advisor to the mayor of Boston and the governor of Massachusetts; executive director of The Boston Compact, a public/private partnership; and education program director at The Pew Charitable Trusts. He has written and spoken widely on such topics as standards-based reform, the transition from high school to postsecondary education and employment, and public/private partnerships. In recent years Schwartz has contributed to two major OECD studies, Learning for Jobs (2010) and Strong Performers and Successful Reformers (2010); co-authored Pathways to Prosperity (2011), an influential report calling for more attention to career and technical education; and co-edited The Futures of School Reform (2012).

Donna E. Shalala is professor of political science and education and president of the University of Miami, Florida. She received her AB from Western College for Women and her PhD from Syracuse University. A National Academy of Education (NAE)/Spencer postdoctoral fellow, she was associate professor and chair of the politics and education program at Teachers College from 1971-1977. In the Carter Administration, she served as assistant secretary for policy development and research at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development from 1977-1980). From 1980-1987 she was professor of political science and president of Hunter College, the City University of New York, and from 1987-1993 she was professor of political science and educational policy studies and chancellor of the University of Wisconsin, Madison. In January of 1993 Shalala was confirmed as the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services. She served the entire eight years of the Clinton Administration. Her research interests include the political economy of state and local government and education. In addition to NAE, she is a member of the National Academy of Public Administration, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Social Insurance, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and The American Philosophical Society.

Lorrie Shepard is professor of Research and Evaluation Methodology and dean of the School of Education at the University of Colorado at Boulder.  Her research focuses on psychometrics and the use and misuse of tests in education settings.  In addition to technical work on validity theory, standard setting, and statistical models for detecting test bias, her studies evaluating test use have addressed the identification of learning disabilities, readiness screening for kindergarten, grade retention, teacher testing, and effects of high-stakes accountability testing on teaching and learning.  She served as President of the American Educational Research Association, President of the National Council on Measurement in Education, and President of the National Academy of Education.  She has received Distinguished Career Awards from the National Council on Measurement in Education, the American Educational Research Association, and the Educational Testing Service. 
http://www.colorado.edu/education/faculty/lorrieshepard/index.html

Lee S. Shulman was the 8th President of The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the first Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education Emeritus and Professor of Psychology Emeritus (by courtesy) at Stanford University and from 1963 to 1982 served as Professor of Educational Psychology and Medical Education at Michigan State University where he founded and co-directed the Institute for Research on Teaching (IRT). Shulman is past president of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and received its highest honor, the career award for Distinguished Contributions to Educational Research. He is a member of the National Academy of Education, having acted as both vice president and president. Shulman’s service on boards of directors includes the Spencer Foundation, and he has acted as advisor to such organizations as the Center for Advancement of Scholarship in Engineering Education, the American Hebrew Academy, Olin College, the Mandel Foundation, and Wabash College’s Center for Inquiry in the Liberal Arts. He is the recipient of the American Psychological Association’s 1995 E.L. Thorndike Award for Distinguished Psychological Contributions to Education, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and has been awarded 2006 Grawemeyer Prize in Education. In 2004, Shulman’s collected writings on teacher education and higher education were published by Jossey-Bass Inc., in two volumes, The Wisdom of Practice and Teaching as Community Property. His research has dealt with the quality of teaching and teacher education; knowledge growth among those learning to teach; the assessment of teaching; medical education; the psychology of instruction in science, mathematics and medicine; the logic of educational research; and the quality of teaching in higher education. His most recent studies emphasize the central role of a scholarship of teaching” in supporting needed changes in the cultures of higher education, and the function and features of signature pedagogies in professional education.

Robert Siegler is Teresa Heinz Professor of Cognitive Psychology. His research focuses on children's thinking, particularly their mathematical and scientific thinking. He has published more than 200 articles and chapters, written 8 books, and edited 5 others. His books have been translated into numerous languages, including Japanese, Chinese, Korean, German, French, Greek, and Portuguese. Dr. Siegler's research focuses on the development of problem solving and reasoning in general and on the more specific topics of how children learn mathematics and how theoretical understanding of mathematical development can be applied to improving the learning of preschoolers from low-income backgrounds. The theoretically oriented research examines how children's basic representations of numbers influence their ability to learn whole number arithmetic, fractions, and other aspects of mathematics. Among the topics examined within this work are how representations of numbers change with age and experience, types of mathematical experiences that are especially helpful in producing improvements, the strategies that children use to solve mathematical problems, why some children are more mathematically proficient than others, and how children discover new strategies. This research suggested that certain types of numerical board games would be especially helpful for improving young children's mathematical understanding. Experimental tests of this prediction have yielded encouraging results; playing these board games yields large, rapid, and enduring gains in preschoolers' and young elementary school children's numerical understanding. The gains are especially large with preschoolers from low-income backgrounds. http://www.psy.cmu.edu/~siegler/

Judith D. Singer is Senior Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity and James Bryant Conant Professor of Education at Harvard University. An internationally renowned statistician and social scientist, Singer’s scholarship focuses on improving the quantitative methods used in social, educational, and behavioral research. Her contributions on multilevel modeling, survival analysis, and individual growth modeling have made these and related statistical methods accessible to empirical researchers. Her publications include numerous papers and book chapters as well as three co-authored books: By Design: Planning Better Research in Higher Education, Who Will Teach: Policies that Matter, and Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis: Modeling Change and Event Occurrence. Singer is an elected member of the National Academy of Education, Fellow of the American Statistical Association and Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. She has also been honored with a fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. In 2012, her nomination by President Obama to serve as a member of the Board of Directors of the National Board of Education Sciences was confirmed by the US Senate. She is also a founding Board member of the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness. Appointed Assistant Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) in 1984, Singer was promoted to Associate Professor in 1988 and Professor in 1993. She was named the James Bryant Conant Professor of Education in 2001. From 1999 to 2004 Singer served as academic dean of HGSE and acting dean from 2001 to 2002. She received her B.A. in Mathematics, summa cum laude, from the State University of New York at Albany in 1976 and her Ph.D. in Statistics from Harvard University in 1983.
http://www.gse.harvard.edu/~faculty/singer/

Diana T. Slaughter was the Inaugural Constance E. Clayton Professor in Urban Education at the University of Pennsylvania from 1998 until she became Clayton Professor Emerita July, 2011.
Her research interests included culture, primary education, and home-school relations facilitating in-school academic achievement. Before joining Penn in 1998, Dr. Slaughter-Defoe taught for 20 years at Northwestern University’s School of Education and Social Policy (1977-97). Prior to joining Northwestern, she had served on the faculties of the Department of Psychiatry at Howard University in Washington, DC (1967-68), the Child Study Center at Yale University (1968-70), and the Committee on Human Development and Department of Education at the University of Chicago (1970-77). At Northwestern, she was a member of the Institute for Policy Research Studies and the Department of African American Studies. She concluded a collaborative research evaluation of the Comer School Development Program, a parent-focused school reform model implemented in several lower-income Chicago schools. Papers were presented at the International Conference on the Study of Behavioral Development in Beijing, China (summer 2000) and at the 2001 biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development.
In 1994, the American Psychological Association cited her for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy. Dr. Slaughter-Defoe has been an elected member of the Governing Council of the Society for Research in Child Development, and a member of the Board of the Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC) at the University of Pittsburgh.
She has completed government-funded research in the area of middle school-aged children’s and families’ experiences in diverse urban private school settings. Her publications include an edited volume on this topic (Greenwood Press, 1988) that is a classic first.” Ethnographic research in Philadelphia with post-doctoral fellows focused on the study of the learning environments in the primary grades of two Philadelphia elementary schools that were successfully serving 40 percent or more lower-income and African-American children. 
Formerly a member of the editorial boards of Child Development (associate editor), Applied Developmental Psychology, and Educational Researcher, she is currently a member of Human Development and NHSA Dialog: A Research-To-Practice Journal for the Early Intervention Field.
In 2006-07, she and partners implemented two child intervention projects (a) Go-Girls, an NSF-funded dissemination project with middle-school age girls; and (b) Summer Freedom School, a Children’s Defense Fund literacy program reaching 100 K–5th grade children in West Philadelphia. The Go-Girl project is discussed in a fall/winter 2010/11 special issue on the effects of voluntary mentoring on mentors (Slaughter-Defoe is guest editor) of Educational Horizons, and the 2007 Summer Freedom School project was the subject of a 26-minute film emphasizing quality education for African American youth that was sponsored by Penn GSE, for which Dr. Slaughter-Defoe is a co-producer.
She received a B.A. from the Committee on Human Development, University of Chicago, in 1962; an M.A. from the Committee in 1964; and the Ph.D. from the Committee with emphasis on Developmental and Clinical Psychology in 1968; in 1969 her dissertation received a distinguished research award from Pi Lambda Theta. In June 2007, the University of Chicago awarded her its Lifetime Professional Achievement Citation.

Robert Slavin is currently Director of the Center for Research and Reform in Education at Johns Hopkins University, Professor at the Institute for Effective Education at the University of York (England), and Chairman of the Success for All Foundation. He received his B.A. in Psychology from Reed College in 1972, and his Ph.D. in Social Relations in 1975 from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Slavin has authored or co-authored more than 200 articles and 20 books, including Educational Psychology: Theory into Practice (Allyn & Bacon, 1986, 1988, 1991, 1994, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2009, 2012), Cooperative Learning: Theory, Research, and Practice (Allyn & Bacon, 1990, 1995), Show Me the Evidence: Proven and Promising Programs for America’s Schools (Corwin, 1998), Effective Programs for Latino Students(Erlbaum, 2000), Two Million Children: Success for All (Corwin, 2009). He received the American Educational Research Association’s Raymond B. Cattell Early Career Award for Programmatic Research in 1986, the Palmer O. Johnson award for the best article in an AERA journal in 1988 and in 2008, the Charles A. Dana award in 1994, the James Bryant Conant award from the Education Commission of the States in 1998, the Outstanding Leadership in Education Award from the Horace Mann League in 1999, the Distinguished Services Award from the Council of Chief State School Officers in 2000, and the AERA Review of Research Award in 2009.

Marshall "Mike" Smith recently retired from the federal government where he served the last time for 17 months as a Senior Counselor to the Secretary of Education in the Obama administration. Before that he was the program director for education at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in Menlo Park, California, from 2001 to 2008. Prior to that, he was acting deputy secretary and under secretary for seven years in the Department of Education during the Clinton Administration. During the Carter Administration, he was chief of staff to the secretary of education and assistant commissioner for policy studies in the Office of Education. During the Ford administration he was the Associate Director at the National Institute of Education. While not in government, he was at different times an associate professor at Harvard, and a professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Stanford University. At Stanford, he was also the dean of the School of Education.

Catherine Snow is Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She received her BA from Oberlin College and her MA and PhD from McGill University. Snow has received research funding from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Ford Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation, and the Spencer foundation. Her publications include Is Literacy Enough? Pathways to Academic Success for Adolescents (with M. Porche, P. Labors and S. Harris), Pragmatic Development(with Anat Ninio) and Talking to Children: Language Input and Acquisition (with Charles Ferguson). She chaired the National Research Council Committee on Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children, the RAND Reading Study Group that produced the report Reading for Understanding, and the subcommittee of the NAE Committee on Teacher Education that produced Knowledge to Support the Teaching of Reading.  She is currently pursuing research on issues of middle school literacy achievement in collaboration with the Boston Public Schools, which has been established as the first Strategic Education Research Partnership (SERP) field site.
http://www.gse.harvard.edu/~snow
 
http://www.gse.harvard.edu/~pild/

http://serpinstitute.org

Margaret Beale Spencer received a PhD in Child and Developmental Psychology from the University of Chicago, Committee on Human Development. Her identity-focused cultural ecological theory-development activities (i.e., Phenomenological Variant of Ecological Systems Theory) and adolescent-focused developmental research efforts address resiliency, identity, and competence formation processes of ethnically diverse youth. The program of research and human development theorizing evolves from her initial early-, middle-childhood and youth-focused research efforts. Her cumulative human development research foundation, which supports all aspects of her current work and its application as programming, emanates from several decades of thematic research emphases. The programmatic research history includes: Processes of basic African American child development; varying levels of impoverished youth and their responsiveness to monetary incentive-based programming; resiliency enhancement and reactive coping processes of male youth; and the multi-strategy assessment of neighborhood settings as the context for youth development, more generally. Spencer’s research and collaborative applications are based on the perspective that all humans are vulnerable (i.e., all possess both risks and protective factors). Its resiliency emphasis maintains an investigation of youths’ emerging capacity for constructive coping and healthy outcomes while developing under varying types and levels of challenging conditions. She has published approximately 125 articles and chapters, completed four edited volumes, and received funding from over three dozen federal and philanthropic agencies. Spencer has presented major invited lectures (e.g., 2008 Clayton Lecture, University of Pennsylvania; 2008 Ridley Lecture, University of Virginia; the 2007thAmerican Educational Research Association [AERA] Brown Lecture; and 2001 Lois Bloom Lecture, Pennsylvania State University). In addition, she has been the recipient of numerous honors: Elected (2009) Membership into the National Academy of Education; American Psychological Association [APA] Senior Career Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest; APA Fellow Status of Divisions 1, 7, 15, and 45; Inaugural Fellow status of AERA; and the 2006 Fletcher Fellowship, which recognizes work that furthers the broad social goals of the U.S. Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education Decision of 1954. She joined the faculty of the University of Chicago, Department of Comparative Human Development and the College, and the Committee on Education (January 2009) as the Marshall Field IV Professor of Urban Education.

James Spillane is the Spencer T. and Ann W. Olin Professor in Learning and Organizational Change at the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. He is also professor of Human Development and Social Policy, professor of Learning Sciences, professor of Management and Organizations, and faculty associate at Northwestern's Institute for Policy Research. Spillane has published extensively on issues of education policy, policy implementation, school reform, and school leadership. His work explores the policy implementation process at the state, district, school, and classroom levels, focusing on intergovernmental and policy-practice relations. He also studies organizational leadership and change, conceptualizing organizational leadership as a distributed practice. Recent projects include studies of relations between organizational infrastructure and instructional advice-seeking in schools and the socialization of new school principals. His work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, Institute of Education Sciences, Spencer Foundation, Sherwood Foundation and Carnegie Corporation of New York. He has authored several books including Standards Deviation: How Local Schools Misunderstand Policy (Harvard University Press, 2004), Distributed Leadership (Jossey-8ass, 2006), Distributed Leadership in Practice (Teachers College Press, 2011) Diagnosis and Design for School Improvement (Teachers College Press, 2011), and numerous journal articles and book chapters. In 2013 he was awarded the Ver Steeg Research Fellowship at Northwestern University.
http://www.distributedleadership.org

Claude M. Steele is the new I. James Quillen Dean for the School of Education at Stanford University. Previously he served as the twenty-first Provost of Columbia University, as well as a Professor of Psychology. He was educated at Hiram College and at Ohio State University, where he received his Ph.D. in Psychology in 1971.  He has received honorary degrees from the University of Michigan, the University of Chicago, Yale University, Princeton University, and from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He taught at the University of Utah, the University of Washington, and the University of Michigan.  Before joining the University, he was a faculty member at Stanford University, holding appointments as the Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences, as Director of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, and as the Director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He is recognized as a leader in the field of social psychology and for his commitment to the systematic application of social science to problems of major societal significance.  His research focuses on the psychological experience of the individual and, particularly, on the experience of threats to the self and the consequences of those threats.  His early work considered the self-image threat, self-affirmation and its role in self-regulation, the academic under-achievement of minority students, and the role of alcohol and drug use in self-regulation processes and social behavior.  While at Stanford University, he further developed the theory of stereotype threat, designating a common process through which people from different groups, being threatened by different stereotypes, can have quite different experiences in the same situation.  The theory has also been used to understand group differences in performance ranging from the intellectual to the athletic. He has published articles in numerous scholarly journals, including the American Psychologist, The Journal of Applied Social Psychology, the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, theJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, and the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.  His recent book, Whistling Vivaldi: And Other Clues to How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do was published in 2010. He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Education, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and to the American Philosophical Society. He is a member of the Board of the Social Science Research Council and of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Board of Directors. He has received numerous fellowships and awards. He was the recipient of the Dean’s Teaching Award from Stanford University.  The American Psychological Association has bestowed on him the Senior Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest and the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award (1998).  The American Psychological Society presented him with the William James Fellow Award for Distinguished Scientific Career Contribution (2000).  The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues awarded him the Gordon Allport Prize in Social Psychology (1997) and the Kurt Lewin Memorial Award (1998).  He received the Donald Campbell Award from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2001). Steele is also the new I. James Quillen Dean for the School of Education sat Stanford University.
http://www.casbs.org

Robert J. Sternberg was Provost, Senior Vice President, Professor of Psychology, and Regents Professor of Education at Oklahoma State University. Prior to that, he was Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Psychology and Education at Tufts University.  His Ph.D. is from Stanford University and his B.A. summa cum laude is from Yale University.  He also holds 12 honorary doctorates. Prior to moving to Tufts, he was the IBM Professor of Psychology and Education at Yale University, where he spent his entire faculty career. Sternberg has been President of numerous organizations, including the American Psychological Association.  He is the author of over 1300 journal articles, book chapters, and books, and has received over $20 million in grants and contracts. The central focus of his research is on intelligence, creativity, wisdom, learning styles, and leadership. Sternberg is the author of College Admissions for the 21st Century (Harvard, 2010) and co-author Explorations in Giftedness (Cambridge, 2011). As Provost, he focused on how a university can develop the active citizens and leaders of the next generation who will make a positive, meaningful, and enduring difference to the world.

James W. Stigler is professor of psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles,  director of the TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study) video studies, and founder and CEO of LessonLab Inc. He is co-author of two recent books, The Teaching Gap (with James Hiebert) and The Learning Gap (with Harold Stevenson). He received his AB from Brown University in 1976, a masters in education from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977, and a PhD in developmental psychology from the University of Michigan in 1982. Before moving to Los Angeles in 1991, he served for eight years on the faculty of the University of Chicago. He has received numerous awards for his research, including a Guggenheim fellowship in 1989 and the QuEST award from the American Federation of Teachers in 1995. Stigler is best known for his observational work in classrooms and has pioneered the use of multimedia technology for the study of classroom instruction. http://www.psych.ucla.edu/faculty/faculty_page?id=63&area=4

Deborah J. Stipek is Professor and the former James Quillen Dean of Education at Stanford University. Her doctorate is from Yale University in developmental psychology. Her scholarship concerns instructional effects on children’s achievement motivation, early childhood education, elementary education and school reform. In addition to her scholarship, she served for five years on the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Academy of Sciences and chaired the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Increasing High School Students’ Engagement & Motivation to Learn. Dr. Stipek served 10 of her 23 years at UCLA as Director of the Corinne Seeds University Elementary School and the Urban Education Studies Center. She joined the Stanford School of Education as Dean and Professor of Education in January 2001. http://ed.stanford.edu/faculty/stipek

Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco's research, on conceptual and empirical problems in the areas of cultural psychology and psychological anthropology with a focus on the study of mass migration, globalization, and education, has been funded by the NSF, W. T. Grant, Spencer, Ford, Carnegie, other national and international foundations, and donors. He is author of numerous scholarly essays, award-winning books, and edited volumes published by Harvard University Press, Stanford University Press, the University of California Press, Cambridge University Press, New York University Press, and numerous scholarly papers appearing in international journals, in a range of disciplines and languages, including Harvard Educational Review, Revue Française de Pédagogie (Paris), Harvard Business Review, Cultuur en Migratie (Leuven), Harvard International Review, Temas: Cultura, Ideologia y Sociedad (Havana), Harvard Policy Review, Ethos, International Migration (Geneva), Anthropology and Education Quarterly, The Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Annual Reviews of Anthropology, and others. 

Professor Suarez-Orozco is Dean of UCLA's Graduate School of Education and Information Studies and Distinguished Professor of Education. At NYU he was the founding Courtney Sale Ross University Professor of Globalization and Education and also held the title of University Professor. At Harvard, he was the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Education and Culture. In 1997, along with Carola Suarez-Orozco, he co-founded the Harvard Immigration Projects and co-directed the largest study ever funded in the history of the National Science Foundation's Cultural Anthropology division - a study of Asian, Afro-Caribbean, and Latino immigrant youth in American society. The award-winning book reporting the results of this landmark study, Learning A New Land: Immigrant Students in American Society (C. Suarez-Orozco, M. Suarez-Orozco, and I. Todorova) was published by Harvard University Press in 2008 http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674045804. At the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, he was the Richard Fisher Membership Fellow (2009-2010), working on education and globalization - including Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World with Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj, published in 2010 by New York University Presshttp://nyupress.org/books/book-details.aspx?bookId=5962, and on immigration, including Writing Immigration: Scholars and Journalists in Dialogue published by the University of California Press in 2011 http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520267183. In 2004 he was elected to the National Academy of Education, in 2006 he was awarded The Mexican Order of the Aztec Eagle - Mexico's highest honor to a foreign national, and in 2012 he was appointed Special Advisor to the Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court and the City of the Hague on Education, Peace, and Justice." 
http://icy.gseis.ucla.edu/

David S. Tatel is a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Before his appointment by President Clinton in 1994, Tatel was a partner and head of the education group at Hogan and Hartson in Washington, DC, for fifteen years. From 1977-1979 he was director of the Office for Civil Rights in the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare under President Carter. Tatel was a member of the board of directors for the Spencer Foundation, which he chaired from 1990 to 1997. He also served as a member of the board of directors of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Tatel currently serves on the board of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, which he chaired until 2008. He received his JD from the University of Chicago in 1966.

William Tierney is University Professor and Wilbur-Kieffer Professor of Higher Education and Co¬director of the Pullias Center for Higher Education at the University of Southern California (USC), and a past President of the American Educational Research Association. Former President of the USC Academic Senate, he has chaired both the Ph.D. program for the USC Rossier School of Education and the University Committee on Academic Review. He serves on the International Advisory Board of King Abdulaziz University (Saudi Arabia) and is an Interdisciplinary Research Fellow at the University of Hong Kong. Dr. Tierney is committed to informing policies and practices related to educational equity. He is involved in projects pertaining to the problems of remediation to ensure that high school students are college-ready, interactive web-enhanced computer games for preparing low-income youth for college, and a project investigating how to improve strategic decision-making in higher education. His recent publications include: The Impact of Culture on Organizational Decision-making, Trust and the Public Good: Examining the Cultural Conditions of Academic Work, and Understanding the Rise of For-profit Colleges and Universities. He has written opinion pieces for the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Sacramento Bee and Huffington Post. Tierney was an academic dean at a Native American community college, a Peace Corps volunteer in Morocco, a Fulbright Scholar in Central America and Australia, and Scholar-in-Residence in Malaysia. He earned a master's from Harvard University and holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University in administration and policy analysis. Tierney has been president of ASHE, vice president of AERA, and is a Fellow of AERA.

Judith Torney-Purta is a developmental and educational psychologist who is Professor in the Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology at the University of Maryland. She has conducted interdisciplinary research for nearly fifty years on young people's knowledge of democracy and on the social and political attitudes necessary to maintain it. The International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) appointed Dr. Torney-Purta as the International Chair of the Steering Committee for their landmark IEA Civic Education Study. Over a ten-year period with colleagues from thirty countries, she led a rigorous study of how young people are prepared for their roles as citizens in democracies and societies aspiring to democracy. In addition to its publications and provision of data for secondary analysis, this study developed a multi-national cadre of early-career researchers. Recently Dr. Torney-Purta has focused on enhancing the public's and policy makers' understanding of methods of assessment and findings from cross-national studies of US students' achievement across subject areas. She has also led efforts to promote effective international collaboration among researchers in the social sciences and education as a member of the U.S. National Committee for Psychological Science at the National Academy of Sciences.

Guadalupe Valdés’ research explores many of the issues of bilingualism relevant to teachers in training, including methods of instruction, typologies, measurement of progress, and the role of education in national policies on immigration. Specifically, she studies the sociolinguistic processes of linguistic acquisition by learners in different circumstances--those who set out to learn a second language in a formal school setting (elective bilingualism) and those who must learn two languages in order to adapt to immediate family-based or work-based communicative needs within an immigrant community (circumstantial bilingualism). Her research in these areas has made her one of the most eminent experts on Spanish-English bilingualism in the United States.

Deborah Vandell is Professor and Dean of Education at the University of California, Irvine where she also is a Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior. Prior to these appointments, Professor Vandell was the Sears Bascom Professor of Education at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The author of more than 150 articles and three books, Professor Vandell's research focuses on the effects of developmental contexts (early child care, schools, after-school programs, families, neighborhoods) on children's social, behavioral, and academic functioning. As one of the principal investigators with the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, she has conducted an intensive study of the development of 1300 children from birth through the end of high school. This work is viewed by many social scientists as one of the most comprehensive studies of the short-term and long-term effects of early child care and the family to date. For 25 years, Professor Vandell also has studied the effects of after-school programs, extracurricular activities and unsupervised out-of-school settings on child and adolescent development, with a particular focus on low-income children of color. This body of work is widely cited as evidence of the benefits after-school programs and activities. Professor Vandell received the faculty distinguished achievement award in the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin and a distinguished teaching award at the University of Texas at Dallas. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and the American Educational Research Association.

Maris Vinovskis is Bentley Professor of History, professor at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan, and a senior research scientist for the Center for Political Studies in the Institute of Social Research. He received his BA from Wesleyan University and his AM and PhD from Harvard University. Vinovskis has received the William Day Leonard Award, the Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship, the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Hudson Professorship. His publications include History and Educational Policymaking; An Epidemic of Adolescent Pregnancy: Some Historical and Policy Considerations; Education, Society, and Economic Opportunity: A Historical Perspective on Persistent Problems; Revitalizing Federal Education Research and Development, The Birth of Head Start and From A Nation at Risk to No Child Left Behind. He was the deputy staff director to the U.S. House Select Committee on Population in 1978 and worked in the 1990s in the U.S. Department of Education on questions of educational research and policy, in both Republican and Democratic administrations.

Lois Weis is State University of New York Distinguished Professor of Sociology of Education at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. She received her PhD in Educational Policy Studies from the University of Wisconsin- Madison. She has written extensively about the current predicament of White, African American, and Latino/a working class and poor youth and young adults, and the complex role gender and race play in their lives in light of contemporary dynamics associated with the global knowledge economy, new patterns of emigration, and the movement of cultural and economic capital across national boundaries. She is the author and/or editor of numerous books and articles relating to race, class, gender, education and the economy, and is currently completing a book manuscript on the production of the new upper middle class in the United States, a class fraction that works across race, ethnicity and national origin in unprecedented fashion. The Univeristy of Chicago Press will publish this volume in 2014. Recently she has turned her attention to opportunities for STEM careers, as shaped by educational opportunity structures within non-selective urban high schools that serve largely low-income students of color (with Margaret Eisenhart). She has received research funding from the Spencer Foundation, Carnegie Foundation, National Science Foundation and Association for Institutional Research. She is a winner of the outstanding book award from the Gustavus Meyers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights in Norht America, as well as a seven-time winner of the American Education Studies Association’s Critic’s Choice Award, given for an outstanding book.

Roger P. Weissberg  is NoVo Foundation Endowed Chair in Social and Emotional Learning, LAS Distinguished Professor, and a Professor of Psychology and Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Professor Weissberg directs the Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) Research Group (http://www.uic.edu/labs/selrg/) at UIC. He is also President and CEO of the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), an international organization committed to making evidence-based social, emotional, and academic learning an essential part of preschool through high school education (http://www.casel.org/). For the past three decades, Professor Weissberg has trained scholars and practitioners about innovative ways to design, implement, and evaluate family, school, and community interventions.

Bernard Weiner received his undergraduate degree from the University of Chicago and his PhD. from the University of Michigan in l963. Since 1965 he has been at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he is currently Distinguished Professor of Psychology. He has written, co-authored, or edited l6 books, including Judgments of Responsibility (l995), and Social Motivation, Justice, and the Moral Emotions (2006), as well as published more than 200 articles. He has been awarded the Donald Campbell Research Award and the Edward L. Thorndike Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Psychological Association, the Distinguished Scientist Award from the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, and the Palmer Johnson Publication Award from the American Educational Research Association. In addition to a Distinguished Teaching Award, he holds honorary degrees from the University of Bielefeld, Germany; Turku University, Finland; and the University of Manitoba, Canada.

Amy Stuart Wells is a Professor of Sociology and Education and the Director of the Center for Understanding Race and Education (CURE) at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research and writing has focused broadly on issues of race and education and more specifically on educational policies such as school desegregation, school choice, charter schools, and tracking and how they shape and constrain opportunities for students of color. Wells’ current research project, “Metro Migrations, Racial Segregation and School Boundaries,” examines urban and suburban demographic change over the last 10 years and the role that public schools and their boundaries play in who moves where.

From 2009-2011 Wells was the Director of the Building Knowledge for Social Justice Project (2009-2011) at the Ford Foundation. From 1999-2006, she was the principal investigator of a five-year study of adults who attended racially mixed high schools funded by the Spencer, Joyce and Ford Foundations. She is the author and co-author of multiple books, academic articles and book chapters, including Both Sides Now: The Story of School Desegregation’s Graduates and most recently, “Longing for Milliken: Why Rodriguez Would Have Been Good but Not Enough.” In K. J. Robinson and C. Ogletree (Eds) Rodriguez at 40: Exploring New Paths to Equal Educational Opportunity. In addition, Wells began her career as a journalist and continues to write for the popular press.

Wells is also the recipient of several honors and awards, including a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association (2013 inductee), 2007-2008 Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences; a 2001-02 Fellowship from the Carnegie Corporation's Scholars Program; the 2000 Julius & Rosa Sachs Lecturer, Teachers College-Columbia University; and the 2000 AERA Early Career Award for Programmatic Research. In 1999-2000 she was a Russell Sage Visiting Scholar. In 1995-96 she was a National Academy of Education-Spencer Foundation Post-doctoral fellow, and 1990-91 she was a Spencer Dissertation Fellow.

Clifton R. Wharton Jr. is the former chair and chief executive officer of the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association and College Retirement Equities Fund, president emeritus of Michigan State University, and former chancellor of the State University of NewYork System. He was U.S. Deputy Secretary of State in 1993. A chairman of the Rockefeller Foundation, he received his BA from Harvard University, MA from Johns Hopkins University and the University of Chicago, and PhD from the University of Chicago. Wharton has received the American Council on Education’s Distinguished Service Award for Lifetime Achievement, the President’s Award on World Hunger, and sixty-three honorary degrees. His publications include Patterns for Lifelong Learning and Subsistence Agriculture and Economic Development.

Carl Wieman was confirmed by the United States Senate to serve as the Associate Director for Science at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy in September 2010. Carl previously divided his time between the University of British Columbia and the University of Colorado. At each institution, he served as both the Director of Collaborative Science Education Initiatives aimed at achieving widespread improvement in undergraduate science education and as a Professor of Physics. From 1984 through 2006, he was a Distinguished Professor of Physics and Presidential Teaching Scholar at the University of Colorado. While at the University of Colorado, he was a Fellow of JILA (a joint federal-university institute for interdisciplinary research in the physical sciences) and he served as the Chair of JILA from 1993-1995. Dr. Wieman has conducted extensive research in atomic and laser physics. His research has been recognized with numerous awards including sharing the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2001 for the creation of a new form of matter known as Bose-Einstein condensation”. Dr. Wieman has also worked extensively on research and innovations for improving science education; he was the founding Chair of the National Academy of Science Board on Science Education. He has received numerous awards, including the National Science Foundation’s Distinguished Teaching Scholar Award (2001), the Carnegie Foundation’s U.S. University Professor of the Year Award (2004), and the American Association of Physics Teachers’ Oersted Medal (2007) for his work on science education. Dr. Wieman received his B.S. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1973 and his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1977.
https://physics.stanford.edu/people/faculty/carl-wieman

John B. Willett is the Charles William Eliot Professor of Education at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education.  He was educated at Oxford University, where he studied physics, specializing in quantum mechanics, and then received his doctorate in quantitative methods from Stanford University.  His research focuses on methods for analyzing the timing and occurrence of events; modeling change, learning, and development; and longitudinal research design.  His most recent book (written with National Academy of Education member Judith Singer) is Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis: Modeling Change and Event Occurrence. http://hugse9.harvard.edu/gsedata/Resource_pkg.profile?vperson_id=217

Mark Wilson has just been elected as the President of the Psychometric Society for 2011-2012. He is a Professor of Education at the University of California, Berkeley, and a Senior Research Fellow at Oxford University. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and founding Editor of the journal Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives. He recently gave the William Angoff Memorial Lecture (Educational Testing Service) and the Samuel J. Messick Memorial Lecture (Learning Testing Research Colloquium, University of Melbourne). His interests in measurement range from (a) reforming the approach typically taken to measurement in education and, more broadly, across the social sciences, to (b) innovations in mathematical and statistical modeling for measurement, to (c) the policy and practical issues involved in educational and psychological assessment. These interests are founded upon the core professional practice of developing practical assessments and assessment systems—these focus on educational applications, but also reach out into a broader range of areas including psychological and health applications. In the last several years, he has published four books that illustrate the breadth of his interests.Constructing measures: An item response modeling approach is an introduction to modern measurement; Explanatory item response models: A generalized linear and nonlinear approach, co-authored with Paul De Boeck of the University of Amsterdam), introduces an overarching framework for the statistical modeling of measurements. Towards coherence between classroom assessment and accountability is an edited volume exploring the relationships between large-scale assessment and classroom-level assessment. He has also recently co-chaired the National Research Council Committee on Assessment of Science Achievement—its report, the fourth book, is entitled Systems for state science assessment.

William Julius Wilson is Lewis P. and Linda L. Geyser University Professor at Harvard University. He received his BA from Wilberforce University, his MA from Bowling Green State University, and his PhD from Washington State University. Wilson has received the MacArthur Prize Fellowship and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the Institute of Medicine. In 1998 he was awarded the National Medal of Science. His publications include The Declining Significance of Race: Blacks and Changing American Institutions; The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy; andWhen Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor. 

Suzanne Wilson is currently Professor of Curriculum & Instruction at the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut. Wilson was previously University Distinguished Professor at Michigan State University, where she currently served as Chair and Professor in the Department of Teacher Education. Her undergraduate degree is in history and American Studies from Brown University; she also has a M. S. in Statistics and a Ph.D. in Psychological Studies in Education from Stanford University. Prior to joining the faculty at MSU, Wilson was the first director of the Teacher Assessment Project (PI, Lee Shulman), which developed prototype assessments for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Dr. Wilson is a committed teacher, having taught undergraduate, MA, and doctoral classes in educational policy, teacher learning, and research methods. She has directed 20 dissertations, and served as a committee member on another twenty-five. While at Michigan State, she collaborated on several large-scale research projects, including the National Center for Research on Teacher Education, the Educational Policy and Practice Study, and the National Partnership for Excellence and Accountability in Teaching. She has written on teacher knowledge, curriculum reform, educational policy, and teacher learning. She is currently co-PI on Learning Science as Inquiry with the Urban Advantage: Formal-informal Collaborations to Increase Science Literacy and Student Learning, a collaboration with Urban Advantage, a professional development program offered throughout NYC in which she is investigating what teachers learn from opportunities to engage in secondary science research. Her current work concerns exploring various measures of teaching and teachers’ understanding that might be used for teacher education and education research, as well as a study of the contemporary and jurisdictional battles over who should control teacher education and licensure. She has published in American Educator, American Educational Research Journal, Educational Researcher, Elementary School Journal, Journal of Teacher Education, Phi Delta Kappan, and Teaching Education. She is author of California Dreaming: Reforming Mathematics Education (Yale, 2003), and editor of Lee Shulman’s collection of essays, Wisdom of practice: Essays on teaching, learning, and learning to teach (Jossey-Bass, 2004).

Hiro Yoshikawa is the Courtney Sale Ross University Professor of Globalization and Education at Steinhardt, and co-director of the Institute on Globalization and Education in Metropolitan Settings (IGEMS). He is a community and developmental psychologist who studies the effects of public policies and programs related to immigration, early childhood, and poverty reduction on children's development. He has also conducted research on culture and sexuality in HIV / AIDS risk and prevention. He conducts research in the United States and in low-and middle-income countries. He currently serves on the Leadership Council and as the Co-Chair of the early childhood development and education workgroup of the U.N. Sustainable Development Solutions Network, the research and technical group advising the Secretary-General on the post-2015 global development goals. His recent books include Making it Work: Low-Wage Employment, Family Life and Child Development (2006, Russell Sage, with Thomas Weisner and Edward Lowe), Toward Positive Youth Development: Transforming Schools and Community Programs (2008, Oxford University Press, with Marybeth Shinn), and Immigrants Raising Citizens: Undocumented Parents and Their Young Children (2011, Russell Sage, sole authored). He has served on the Board on Children, Youth and Families of the National Academy of Sciences, the Early Childhood Advisory Committee of the Inter¬American Development Bank, and the DHHS Advisory Committee on Head Start Research and Evaluation for the Clinton and Obama Administrations. In 2012 he was nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate as a member of the National Board for Education Sciences. In 2013 he was elected to the National Academy of Education. He obtained his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from NYU.

Ken Zeichner is Boeing Professor of Teacher Education, University of Washington, Seattle. From 1976 to 2009, he was a faculty member in the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his PhD in 1976 from Syracuse University specializing in School Organizational Behavior and Change. He has had visiting appointments at Deakin University (Australia),Umea University (Sweden), Simon Fraser University (Canada), the University of Southern California, the University of Gothenburg (Sweden), and the University of Minnesota. He received a Fulbright senior specialist award in 2004 which he spent in Australia. The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education awarded him the Margaret B. Lindsay Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research on Teacher Education in 2002 and a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009. He won the AACTE annual award for Excellence in Professional Writing in 1982, 1993, and 2002, the Association of Teacher Educator’s Distinguished Research Award in 1990 and was named Wisconsin Teacher Educator of the Year in 1992 by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. His books include Teacher education and the struggle for social justice, Studying teacher education (with Marilyn Cochran-Smith), Currents of reform in pre-service teacher education(with Susan Melnick and Mary Gomez), Issues and practices in inquiry-oriented education(with Bob Tabachnick), Teacher Education and the social conditions of schooling andReflective teaching (both with Dan Liston) and Democratic teacher education reform in Africa(with Lars Dahlstrom).

MEMBERS EMERITI

Carl Bereiter is a professor emeritus at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. He received his BA, MA, and PhD from the University of Wisconsin. Bereiter has been a Guggenheim fellow and twice a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. His books include The Psychology of Written Composition andSurpassing Ourselves: An Inquiry into the Nature and Implications of Expertise (both with Marlene Scardamalia) and Education and Mind in the Knowledge Age. Also with Scardamalia, he is developer of CSILE (Computer-Supported Intentional Learning Environments). http://www.ikit.org/people/~bereiter.html

Charles Bidwell is William Claude Reavis Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Education at the University of Chicago. He received his AB, AM, and PhD from the University of Chicago. Bidwell has been a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellow and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2007 he was given the Willard Waller Award for a Career of Distinguished Scholarship by the American Sociological Association. His publications include The Organization and Its Ecosystem: A Theory of Structuring in Organizations and Structuring in Organizations: Ecosystem Theory Evaluated(both with John Kasarda).

Derek Bok has been a lawyer, professor of law, dean of the Harvard Law School, and president of Harvard University, where he currently serves as Three Hundredth Anniversary University Professor. He holds an AB from Stanford University, a JD from Harvard Law School, and an AM in economics from The George Washington University. He served on the board of trustees of the University of Massachusetts from 1993 to 1996 and currently serves as national chair of Common Cause and as chair of the board of overseers for the Curtis Institute of Music. His current research interests include the state of higher education and a project sponsored by several foundations on the adequacy of government in the United States in coping with the nation's domestic problems. 

Jerome Bruner is a University Professor Emeritus at New York University. Bruner has also served as a professor at Harvard, Oxford, and the New School for Social Research. He received his BA from Duke University and his PhD in Psychology from Harvard University. He has also received honorary doctorates from Yale, Oxford, the Sorbonne, Harvard, among others. Bruner has been awarded the International Balzan Prize, the CIBA Gold Medal for Scientific Research, and the Distinguished Scientific Award of the American Psychological Association (of which he has also served as President). His publications include The Process of EducationA Study of ThinkingThe Culture of EducationActs of Meaning, and Minding the Law (with Anthony Amsterdam). His latest volume, Making Stories: Law, Literature, Life, was published in 2002. He is also a veteran sailor, the only professor in Oxford’s long history who sailed his boat across the Atlantic to come occupy his chair at that ancient university. http://its.law.nyu.edu/facultyprofiles/profile.cfm?section=bio&personID=19807

Courtney Cazden is Charles William Eliot Professor of Education Emerita at Harvard University. She received her AB from Radcliffe College, her MEd from the University of Illinois, and her EdD from Harvard University. Cazden has received the American Educational Research Association Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Education, a Fulbright research fellowship, and a fellowship from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Her publications include Child Language and Education, Functions of Language in the Classroom, Whole Language Plus = Essays on Literacy in the US and New Zealand, and Classroom Discourse. In retirement, she has been a visiting researcher in Singapore and Australia since 2003, and in 2010 was a visiting professor at the University of Waikato in New Zealand. courtney_cazden@harvard.edu

K. Patricia  Cross is David Pierpont Gardner Professor of Higher Education, Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley.  Previously she served as Dean of Students at Cornell, Distinguished Research Scientist at Educational Testing Service, Professor of Higher Education and Chair of the Department of Administration, Planning and Social Policy at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.  She has received the Howard Bowen Distinguished Career Award from the Association for the Study of Higher Education, the E.F. Lindquist Award from the American Educational Research Association, the Sydney Suslow Award from the Association for Institutional Research, and was elected president of the American Association of Higher Education. Her publications include Beyond the Open Door, Adults as Learners, Classroom Research, Classroom Assessment Techniques, and Collaborative Learning Techniques.

Larry Cuban is professor emeritus at Stanford University and former president of the American Educational Research Association. He received his BA from the University of Pittsburgh, his MA from Western Reserve University, and his PhD from Stanford University. Cuban has received the John Hay Whitney Fellowship and was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He was named "Teacher of the Year" by students in Stanford's School of Education seven times. His publications include The Blackboard and the Bottom Line: Why Schools Can’t Be Businesses; Tinkering Toward Utopia: Reflections on School Reform (with David Tyack); and Oversold and Underused: Computers in the Classroom.

Robert Dreeben is professor emeritus at the University of Chicago and former chair of the Department of Education and of the Sociology of Education Section of the American Sociological Association (ASA). He received his AB from Oberlin, his AM from Columbia, and his PhD from Harvard in sociology. Publications include On What Is Learned in School;"American Schooling: Patterns and Processes of Stability and Change;" in Barber and Inkeles (eds.), Stability and Social Change; How Schools Work (authored jointly with Rebecca Barr); "The Sociology of Education: Its Development in the United States," the last receiving the Willard Waller Award from the ASA, and Teaching and the Competence of Occupations, in Hedges and Schneider (eds.), The Social Organization of Schooling.”  The book Stability and Change in American Education, edited by Hallinan, Gamoran, Kubitschek, and Loveless, was published in 2003 to mark his contributions.

Nathan Glazer is a professor of education and sociology emeritus at Harvard University. He received his BS from the City College of the City University of New York, his AM from the University of Pennsylvania, and his PhD from Columbia University. Glazer has received John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowships, been a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His publications include American Judaism, Beyond the Melting Pot, Affirmative Discrimination: Ethnic Inequality and Public Policy, The Limits of Social Policy, and We Are All Multiculturalists Now.

John I. Goodlad is a charter academy member and currently is professor emeritus at the University of Washington and president of the nonprofit Institute for Educational Inquiry in Seattle. He holds a PhD from the University of Chicago and honorary doctorates from twenty colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. His nearly three dozen books include several published in the concluding decade of the twentieth century: Access to Knowledge, Places Where Teachers Are Taught, The Moral Dimensions of Teaching, Teachers for Our Nation’s Schools, Educational Renewal, The Public Purpose of Education and Schooling, and In Praise of Education. The following were published in the twenty-first century: Education for Everyone; Agenda for Education in a Democracy; The Teaching Career; Romances with Schools: A Life of Education; A Place Called School, 20thAnniversary Edition; and Education and the Making of a Democratic People.

Maxine Greene is a professor emerita at Teachers College, Columbia University, and director of the Center for Social Imagination at Teachers College. She received her BA from Barnard College of Columbia University and her MA and PhD from New York University. Greene has received the Educator of the Year Award from both Columbia University and Ohio State University, a medal for "distinctive scholarship" from Barnard College, the Teachers College Medal, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Association of Colleges and Universities, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and ten honorary degrees. She is a former president of the Philosophy of Education Society and of AERA, a five-year editor of the Teachers College Record, and a member of a number of editorial boards. Her publications include The Public School and the Private Vision, Existential Encounters for Teachers, Landscapes of Learning, Teacher as Stranger, The Dialectic of Freedom, Releasing Imagination, Variations on a Blue Guitar : The Lincoln Center Institute Lectures on Aesthetic Education, and about seventy-five chapters and articles in anthologies and educational journals. 

James G. Greeno is a visiting professor of education at the University of Pittsburgh and Margaret Jacks Professor of Education emeritus at Stanford University. He received his BA, MA, and PhD from the University of Minnesota. Greeno has received the Edward Lee Thorndike Award, a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, and a fellowship from the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences. His publications include Thinking Practices in Mathematics and Science Learning and The Situativity of Knowing, Learning, and Research.

Jurgen Herbst is a professor emeritus of educational policy studies and history at the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a professional associate of Fort Lewis College, Durango, Colorado. He received his BA from the University of Nebraska, his MA from the University of Minnesota, and his PhD from Harvard University. Herbst has received a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. His publications include The German Historical School in American Scholarship, From Crisis to Crisis: American College Government 1636–1819, And Sadly Teach, The Once and Future School: 350 Years of American Secondary Education, and Requiem for a German Past, School Choice and School Governance: A Historical Study of the United States and Germany, and Women Pioneers of Public Education: How Culture Came to the Wild West.

Father Theodore Hesburgh is president emeritus at the University of Notre Dame. He received his PhD from the Gregorian University in Rome and later attended the Holy Cross College and the Catholic University of America. Hesburgh was ordained to priesthood in 1943. He has received the U.S. Navy’s Distinguished Public Service Award, the Medal of Freedom, and the Clergyman of the Year Award. His publications include Patterns for Educational Growth, Thoughts for Our Times, and The Humane Imperative: A Challenge for the Year 2000.

Philip W. Jackson is David Lee Shillinglaw Distinguished Service Professor emeritus at the University of Chicago. He received his PhD from Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a past president of the American Educational Research Association and the John Dewey Society. His writings include Life in Classrooms, The Practice of Teaching, Untaught Lessons, John Dewey and the Lessons of Art and John Dewey and the Philosopher's Task.He is the co-author (with Jacob Getzels) of Creativity and Intelligence and (with Robert Boostrom and David Hansen) of The Moral Life of Schools.

Henry Thomas James was president of the Spencer Foundation from 1970 to 1985. He received his BS from the University of Wisconsin, LaCrosse, his PhM from the University of Wisconsin, and his PhD from the University of Chicago. James received the National Association of State Boards of Education’s Award for Distinguished Service to Education in 1973, and the Outstanding Service award from the American Educational Finance Association in 1988. His publications include: The Nation’s Report Card (with Lamar Alexander) 1989 NAE.

Judith Lanier is a Distinguished Professor of Teacher Education at Michigan State University. She received her BA from Western Michigan University and her PhD from Michigan State University. Her publications include The Process of Teaching, The Process of Learning, and The Individual and the School.

Marvin Lazerson is Professor Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, and Professor at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary. He received A.B. and M.A. degrees from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in History from Harvard University. A distinguished historian of education, he served as President of the History of Education Society (U.S.). A widely-published scholar, during 1980s and 1990s, he served as dean of Penn's Graduate School of Education and as the University's Interim Provost. During the years, the School and the University achieved previously unprecedented scholarly, reputational and fiscal success. After serving as a university administrator, Professor Lazerson returned to the faculty and was named to the Howard and Judith Berkowitz Chair in Education. His interdisciplinary scholarship covers a broad number of areas, focuses on such issues the purposes of educational institutions, the role of schooling in democratic societies, the relationships between labor markets and education, the improvement of teaching and learning in higher education, and the management of universities. He is especially interested in how public policies develop and the ways they are implemented and managed. His most recent books are: Higher Education and the American Dream (Central European University Press, 2010);The Education Gospel: the Economic Power of Schooling, with W. Norton Grubb (Harvard University Press, 2004, pb. edition 2007); and Institutions of Democracy: the Public Schools, with Susan Fuhrman (Oxford University Press, 2005, pb. edition 2006). Professor Lazerson is also recognized as a teacher and mentor. The students in the Graduate School of Education at Penn named him the School's outstanding teacher. The Spencer Foundation awarded him a special 'mentoring grant' for his role in mentoring graduate students and junior faculty. He currently teaches in the School of Public Policy at Central European University.

Robert LeVine is Roy E. Larsen Professor of Education and Human Development and professor of anthropology at Harvard University. He received his AB and MA from the University of Chicago and his PhD from Harvard University. LeVine has received the Ford Foundation Fellowship in Africa, the National Science Foundation Fellowship, and a fellowship from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. His publications include Child Care and Culture: Lessons from Africa.

James G.  March is a professor of education, political science, sociology, and international management emeritus at Stanford University. He received his BA from the University of Wisconsin and his MA and PhD from Yale University. March has received the Wilbur Lucius Cross Medal from Yale University, the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching from Stanford University, and the Scholarly Contributions to Management Award from the Academy of Management. He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. His publications include: A Primer on Decision Making, Explorations in Organizations, and The Ambiguities of Experience.

Wilbert McKeachie is a professor emeritus at the University of Michigan and past director of the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. He received his BA from Michigan State Normal College and his MA and PhD from the University of Michigan. McKeachie has received the ACT-American Educational Research Association Award for Outstanding Research, the Eastern Michigan Alumni Honors Award, the University of Michigan Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching, the Lifetime Contribution Award of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education, the American Psychological Association Award for Outstanding Contributions, the American Psychological Foundation Gold Medal for Enduring Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest, and eight honorary degrees. His publications include Improving Undergraduate Instruction in Psychology (with D. Wolfe et al.), Man in His World: Human Behavior, Undergraduate Curricula in Psychology (with John Milholland), and Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research and Theory for College and University Teachers.

Robert P. Moses was a pivotal organizer for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), directing its Mississippi Project. He was a driving force behind the 1964 Summer Project and in organizing the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), which challenged the Mississippi regulars at the 1964 Democratic Convention. From1969-76, he worked for the Ministry of Education in Tanzania, where he chaired Same school math department. In 1976, he returned to continue doctoral studies in Philosophy at Harvard. A MacArthur Fellow from 1982-8, Mr. Moses used his fellowship to develop the Algebra Project (AP), believing that mathematics literacy in today’s information age is as important to educational access and citizenship for sharecroppers and day laborers in the 60s. As founder and president of the AP, Mr. Moses also serves as director of the AP’s materials development program. See more at www.algebra.org In 2004, with AP board member Danny Glover, Moses and others launched a national discussion calling for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution for Quality Public School Education as a Civil Right. He has received several university honorary doctoral degrees and honors, including Harvard University, the Heinz Award for the Human Condition, and the Nation/Puffin for Creative Citizenship.

Harold J. Noah is Gardner Cowles Professor emeritus at Teachers College, Columbia University. He received his BS in economics from the University of London and his PhD from Columbia University. His publications include The National Case Study: An Empirical Comparative Study of Twenty-one Educational Systems (with A. Harry Passow et al.), The Economics of Education in the U.S.S.R., Toward a Science of Comparative Education (with Max Eckstein), Secondary School Examinations—International Perspectives on Policies and Practice, Doing Comparative Education: Three Decades of Collaboration, and Fraud and Education: The Worm in the Apple.

Frederick Olafson is a professor of philosophy emeritus at the University of California, San Diego. He received his AB, MA, and PhD from Harvard University. Olafson has received the Fulbright Scholarship at Oxford University, the Hodder Fellowship in the Humanities from Princeton University, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, and the Independent Research Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. His publications include Principles and Persons, The Dialectic of Action: A Philosophical Interpretation of History and the Humanities, Heidegger and the Philosophy of Mind, What is a Human Being, and Naturalism and the Human Condition. 

Ingram Olkin received a BS in mathematics from the City College of New York, a MA in mathematical statistics from Columbia University, and a PhD in theoretical statistics from the University of North Carolina. He has been a professor of statistics and education and Stanford University since 1961, where he has also served as chair of the department from 1973-1976. Olkin’s work is aimed at ensuring that educators select the proper statistical tool for measuring the outcomes of their programs and methods, and that their interpretation of the results is similarly rigorous. His research includes the development of powerful new statistical methods for combining results from independent studies that have analyzed the same topic. Olkin has published (jointly with Larry Hedges) a book on statistical methods for meta-analysis, and recently co-edited (with L.V. Jones) the book The Nation’s Report Card: Evaluation and Perspectives.

Denis C. Phillips is professor emeritus of education and (by courtesy) of philosophy at Stanford University, where he was also associate dean and interim dean of education. Trained initially as a biologist and science teacher, he moved into the philosophy of social science and history of nineteenth and twentieth century thought, concentrating on the emergence of the social sciences and educational research. He received his PhD from the University of Melbourne in the philosophy of science and philosophy of education. Recent publications include Postpositivism and Educational Research (with Nicholas Burbules); The Expanded Social Scientist's Bestiary; Constructivism in Education: Opinions and Second Opinions on Controversial Issues (Ninety-Ninth National Society for the Study of Education Yearbook), editor and contributor; Perspectives on Learning, Fourth Edition (with Jonas Soltis); Muddying the Waters: The Many Purposes of Educational Inquiry”, in Conrad & Serlin (eds), The SAGE Handbook for Research in Education; and Adding Complexity: Philosophical Perspectives on the Relationship Between Evidence and Policy”, in P. Moss (ed.), Evidence and Decision Making (106th NSSE Yearbook).
http://ed.stanford.edu/suse/faculty/displayRecord.php?suid=dcpphdl

Thomas Romberg is Bascom Professor of Education and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He received his BS in mathematics and MS in secondary education from Omaha University and his PhD in mathematics education from Stanford University. He directed the National Center for Research in the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics for the U.S. Department of Education, served as chair of the Commission on Standards for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics that produced the curriculum and assessment standards for school mathematics, was a Fulbright Fellow to the U.S.S.R, was a NSF teacher at the University of Delhi, was a Research Fellow at the University of Tasmania, and a Spencer Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Romberg has received the American Educational Research Association's Research Review Award, Interpretive Scholarship Award, and Professional Service Award; the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Lifetime Achievement Medal; and the International Distinguished Leadership Award in Mathematics Education from the University of South Africa. His publications include A Common Curriculum for Mathematics, Problematic Features of the School Mathematics Curriculum, Perspectives on Scholarship and Research Method, Mathematics Classrooms that Promote Understanding, Standards-based Mathematics Assessment in Middle School, and Understanding in Mathematics and Science Matters.

Richard J. Shavelson is the Margaret Jacks Professor of Education (Emeritus) and former I. James Quillen Dean of the School of Education at Stanford University. Before joining Stanford, he was dean of the Graduate School of Education and professor of statistics (by courtesy) at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has also been professor of education at UCLA and director of the RAND Corporation's Education and Human Resources Program. He served as president of the American Educational Research Association; is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Psychological Association, and the American Psychological Society; and is a Humboldt Fellow. His publications include Statistical Reasoning for the Behavioral Sciences,Generalizability Theory: A Primer (with Noreen Webb), and Scientific Research in Education(edited with Lisa Towne), and Measuring College Learning Responsibly: Accountability in a New Era.

George Spindler is a professor of education and anthropology emeritus at Stanford University. He received his BS from Central State Teachers College, his MA from the University of Wisconsin, and his PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles. Spindler has received the Ford Foundation fellowship and was a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. His publications include Doing the Ethnography of Schooling, What Do Anthropologists Have to Say about Dropouts?, The American Cultural Dialogue and Its Transmission, and Fifty Years of Anthropology and Education, 1950-2000: A Spindler Anthology.

Kenneth Strike was professor emeritus at Cornell University and has most recently taught in the department of cultural foundations of education at Syracuse University. He received his PhD from Northwestern University. He is past president of the Philosophy of Education Society, was elected to the National Academy of Education in 1993, and received a distinguished service award from AERA in 2002. His interests include professional ethics and political philosophy as they apply to educational practice and policy.  His publications include The Ethics of Teaching; Ethical Leadership in Schools: Creating Community in an Environment of Accountability; "Professionalism, Democracy and Discursive Communities" in the  American Education Research Journal; "The Moral Role of Schooling in a Liberal Democratic Society" in the Review of Research in Education; "Liberty, Democracy, and Community: Legitimacy in Public Education" in the 2003 National Society for the Study of Education Yearbook; "The Moral Role of Educators" in the Handbook of Teacher Educationand, most recently, Small Schools and Strong Communities: A Third Way of Educational Reform. He has chosen to retire in New York State’s Adirondack Park and hopes to devote his research skills to its preservation and to the welfare of its people.

Patrick Suppes is Lucie Stern Professor of Philosophy and professor of education, statistics, and psychology emeritus at Stanford University and the founder and director of the Institute for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences. He received his BS from the University of Chicago and his PhD from Columbia University. Suppes has received the Wendell T. Bush Fellowship, the American Psychological Association Fellowship, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, and the National Medal of Science. His publications include Probabilistic Metaphysics, Logique de Probable, A Probabilistic Theory of Causality, and Representation and Invariance of Scientific Structure, and co-author ofFoundations of Measurement, volumes I – III. http://suppes-corpus.stanford.edu

Finis Welch is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Economics at Texas A&M University. He received his BS from the University of Houston and his PhD from the University of Chicago. http://www.welchcon.com/index.php/finis-welch-phd

FOREIGN ASSOCIATES

Hiroshi Azuma is a professor emeritus of education at the University of Tokyo. He received his PhD from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His publications includePsychology in a Non-Western Country, Current Trends in Studies of Behavior Development in Japan, and Different Cultural Approaches. Currently he is the president of Seisen Jogakuin College in Japan.

Miriam Ben-Peretz is Professor Emeritus of Education at the University of Haifa. She is former Dean of the School of Education at the University of Haifa, and past President of Tel-Hai Academic College. The major fields of research and teaching of Prof. Ben-Peretz include curriculum studies, especially the interactions between teachers and curriculum materials; curriculum policy and evaluation; issues of teacher education, especially reform of teacher education programs; teacher thinking with a focus on learning from experience; the culture of teachers and teaching; policy making in education. She has been a Visiting Professor and Lecturer at American, Canadian and European universities. She authored numerous articles and chapters in books, as well as several books including: The Teacher-Curriculum Encounter: Freeing Teachers from the Tyranny of Texts (SUNY 1990), The Nature of Time in Schools (with Rainer Broome) (Teachers College, 1990), Learning from Experience: Memory and the Teacher’s Account of Teaching (SUNY 1995), Behind Closed Doors: Teachers and the Role of the Teachers’ Lounge (with Shifra Schonmann) (SUNY 2000) and Policy-making in Education: A Holistic Approach in Response to Global Changes (Rowan & Littlefield 2009). In 1997, Professor Ben-Peretz was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award, in recognition of outstanding contribution to curriculum studies over an extended period of time, Division B, Curriculum Studies, of the American Educational Research Association. In 2006 she was awarded the Israel Prize for Research in Education.

Kieran Egan is a professor at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia. He received his BA in history from the University of London and his PhD in the philosophy of education from Cornell University. He is the author of many books and articles on teaching and curriculum, including The Educated Mind: How Cognitive Tools Shape our Understanding and Getting it Wrong From the Beginning: Our Progressivist Inheritance From Herbert Spencer, John Dewey, and Jean Piaget. Egan received the Grawemeyer Award in Education in 1991 for his contributions to the field of education. http://www.educ.sfu.ca/kegan/

Michael Fullan is Professor of Policy Studies at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. He received his BA and PhD in sociology from the University of Toronto. Fullan is acknowledged as the world’s leading expert on the educational change and reform process. His 1982 textbook The Meaning of Educational Change (now in its fourth edition, in press) is recognized as the basic text in the field. He has also made a significant and sustained contribution as a researcher and scholar to the reform of teacher education. Fullan was appointed in 2004 as Special Policy Adviser in Education to the Premier, and to the Minister of Education, Ontario. www.michaelfullan.ca

Guy Neave is a distinguished scholar in the area of comparative higher education and has been an active administrator and consultant in a variety of international organizations concerned with higher education, including the World Bank, UNESCO, and the Council of Europe. He has performed studies, written reports for government education agencies, and written on higher education for countries on almost every continent in the world. He is an expert in European history and policy and patterns of organization, finance, governance, and development. With Burton Clark, he served as joint editor-in-chief of The Encyclopedia of Higher Education and edited the European Journal of Education and the journal of the International Association of Universities, Higher Education Policy. He was founder of the Consortium for Higher Education Researchers and is director of research at the International Association of Universities. Some of his publications include The Teaching Nation; Government and Higher Education Relationships Across Three Continents (with Frans van Vught) and Education: The Complete Encyclopedia (with Tprstem Husen, T. Neville Postlethwaite, and Burton Clark). He is also professor in comparative higher education at the Centre for Higher Education Policy Studies at the University of Twente, Netherlands.

David R. Olson is University Professor Emeritus of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education/University of Toronto. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and holds Honorary Doctorates from Gothenberg University (1994) and the University of Saskatchewan (1996), and the University of Toronto (2012). He has published extensively on language, literacy and cognition, including the widely anthologized article From utterance to text: The bias of language in speech and writing” (Harvard Educational Review, 1977). His book, The world on paper: The Conceptual and cognitive implication of writing and reading (Cambridge, 1994) has been translated into eight languages. His most recent authored books are Psychological theory and educational reform: How school remakes mind and society (Cambridge, 2003) and Jerome Bruner: The cognitive revolution in educational theory (Continuum, 2007). He is co-editor with Nancy Torrance ofThe Cambridge Handbook of Literacy (2009) and The Handbook of Education and Human Development (Blackwell, 1996); co-editor with Michael Cole of Technology, literacy and the evolution of society: Implications of the work of Jack Goody (Erlbaum, 2006); co-editor with Janet Astington and Paul Harris of Developing theories of mind (Cambridge, 1988); co-editor with Janet Astington and Philip Zelazo of Developing theories of intention (Erlbaum, 1988); co-editor with Nancy Torrance of Literacy and orality (Cambridge, 1991); and with Nancy Torrance and Angela Hildyard of Literacy, language and learning (Cambridge University Press, 1985).

Michael Rutter is a professor of developmental psychopathology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College, London. He received his MB, ChB, and MD from the University of Birmingham Medical School and his DPM from the University of London. Rutter has received the Society for Research in Child Development Distinguished Scientist Award, the Rema Lapouse Mental Health Epidemiology Award, the C. Anderson Aldrich Award from the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, the American Association on Mental Deficiency Research Award, the Helmut Horten Research Award, the Ruane Prize for Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Research, and the Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health. His publications include Straight and Devious Pathways from Childhood to Adulthood, Parenting Breakdown: The Making and Breaking of Intergenerational Links, Studies of Psychosocial Risk: The Power of Longitudinal Data, Assessment and Diagnosis in Child Psychopathology,and Developing Minds: Challenge and Continuity Across the Lifespan.

Gavriel Salomon was the dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Haifa, Israel, (1993-8) and a professor of educational psychology there. Salomon is currently director of the Center for Research on Peace Education at that university. Prof. Salomon received his B.A. and M.A. (Summa cum Laude) in geography and education from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel (1966), and his Ph.D. in educational psychology and communication from Stanford University (1968). Since then he has taught at the Hebrew University and Tel-Aviv University in Israel, Universidad Ibero Americana in Mexico, and at Harvard, Indiana University, Stanford, USC, University of Michigan and University of Arizona in the USA. Salomon has recently been elected to be a fellow of the International Academy of Education(2006), recived the Clervinga Chair at the Leiden University, The Netherlands (1993-4), received the Sylvia Scribner AERA award, as well as the Israel National Award for life long achievements in educational research (2001), is the recipient of an Honorary Doctorate from the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium (1999), a fellow at the Stanford Center for the Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (1998-9), editor of Educational Psychologist(1991-5), president of the Educational and Instructional Division of the International Association of Applied Psychology (1990-1994) and Fellow of the American Psychological Association (1983). Salomon has written four books: Interaction of Media, Cognition and Learning (1979/1994), announced as a "Citation Classic"; Communication and Education, (1981); Communication (Hebrew, 1981); and Technology and Education in the Information Age (Hebrew, 2001), and edited three books - Distributed Cognitions (1993), Peace education: The concept, the principles and the research (2002), and The Handbook on Peace Education (2010). He has also published more than 120 empirical, theoretical, and methodological articles in a variety of professional journals in the USA, Israel, Europe, and Latin America in the fields of technology, learning, cognition and learning; educational evaluation, and peace education.

Manabu Sato is Emeritus Professor, The University of Tokyo, and Professor, Gakushuin University, Japan. His research interests include action research in school reform, curriculum research, and use of new technology in teacher education. He has also conducted comparative studies of school reform and teacher education in Japan and the United States. Sato received his PhD from the University of Tokyo. His publications include Designing Educational Reform, Learning: Its Death and Restoration, and Learning as Pleasure: Toward Dialogic Practice.

Sidney Strauss received his PhD from the School of Education at Berkeley in 1967 and did two years postdoctoral work in the Psychology Department, also at Berkeley. He teaches in the School of Education (SOE) at Tel Aviv University (TAU) where he is the Branco Weiss Professor of Research in Child Development and Education. In the SOE, he twice served as chair of the Department of Child Development and Education and instituted a number of teaching programs in that capacity. By appointment, he established and served as the head of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching at TAU. He has been the Chief Scientist of the Israeli Ministry of Education from September 2005 and, in that capacity, is responsible for the ministry’s research directions as well as serving as the coordinator for the ministry’s planning and policy. His scholarly publications are in the areas of child development, teacher cognition, and the developmental, primatological and anthropological aspects of teaching. http://www.tau.ac.il/~sidst

John Willinsky is currently Khosla Family Professor of Education at Stanford University, and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He received his BA in English from Laurentian University, his MEd in Educational Theory from the University of Toronto/Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, and his PhD in Educational Foundations from Dalhousie University. His publications include The Triumph of Literature/The Fate of Literacy: Teaching English in the High School; The New Literacy: Redefining Reading and Writing in the Schools; Empire of Words: the Reign of the OED; Learning to Divide the World: Education at Empire’s End, for which he won the Book of the Year Award from the American Educational Research Association in 1998; and The Access Principle: The Case for Open Access to Research and Scholarship. He directs the Public Knowledge Project at UBC, which aims to improve the scholarly quality of and access to research and scholarship. http://ed.stanford.edu/faculty/willinsk 

J. Douglas Willms is a Professor and Director of the Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy at the University of New Brunswick (UNB). He holds the Canada Research Chair in Literacy and Human Development and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and the International Academy of Education. Dr. Willms has published over two hundred research articles and monographs pertaining to youth literacy, children’s health, the accountability of schooling systems, and the assessment of national reforms. He is the editor of Vulnerable Children: Findings from Canada’s National Longitudinal Study of Children and Youth,(University of Alberta Press, 2002) and the author of Student engagement at school: A sense of belonging and participation (Paris: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) and Monitoring School Performance: A Guide for Educators (Falmer Press, 1992). Dr. Willms played a lead role in developing the questionnaires for Canada’s National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) and the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Recently, Willms and his colleagues designed the Early Years Evaluation (EYE), an instrument for the direct assessment of children’s developmental skills at ages 3 to 6, and Tell Them From Me, an evaluation system for the continuous monitoring of school climate and student engagement and wellness. Dr. Willms is known for his training of new investigators in the analysis of complex multilevel data. He regularly conducts workshops on multilevel modeling across Canada and throughout Asia, Europe and Latin America. Dr. Willms’s current interests include the examination of family, school and community factors that contribute to the health and well-being of children and adolescents, and the use of continuous monitoring for evaluating school reforms.

FOREIGN ASSOCIATES EMERITI

Paul Black took his first degree in physics, and subsequently obtained his PhD in crystallography at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge in l954. Between 1956 and 1976 he was a faculty member in the Department of Physics in the University of Birmingham (England), but his interests gradually moved from research in physics to research and development in science education. Dr. Black left Birmingham in 1976 to become professor of science education and director of the Centre for Science and Mathematics Education, at Chelsea College in London, and when Chelsea College merged with King's in 1985 he became the head of the King's Centre for Educational Studies, King's College London (KQC). He retired in 1995, but is still active in research and development work. Dr. Black has been a visiting professor of Education at Stanford University, California. For many years he was involved closely with curriculum development work with the Nuffield foundation in science and in design and technology, at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. He was chair of the government's task group on assessment and testing in 1987-88, and deputy chairman of the national curriculum council from 1989 to 1991. Dr. Black has served on three committees on the USA national research council. He is currently engaged in research and development work to improve classroom practices in formative assessment.

Erik De Corte is professor emeritus of educational psychology and former director (and co-founder) of the Center for Instructional Psychology and Technology (CIP&T) at the University of Leuven, Belgium, where he received his PhD in educational sciences in 1970. De Corte was the founder and first President (1985-1989) of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI) and President of the International Academy of Education (1998-2006). Currently he is the chair of the HERCULES (Higher Education, Research and Culture in European Society) Expert Group of the Academia Europaea (AE), which assists the Council in developing and managing activities and initiatives of the AE. De Corte’s research centers on learning, teaching, and assessment of thinking, problem-solving, learning and self-regulation skills, beliefs and emotions, especially in mathematics. His recent publications include: Self-regulation of mathematical knowledge and skills (with L. Mason, F. Depaepe, and L. Verscahffel) in Handbook of self-regulation of learning and performance (edited by B.J. Zimmerman & D.H. Schunk, 2011, New York: Routledge; Giftedness considered from the perspective of research on learning and instruction. High Ability Studies, 2013, 24, 1-17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13598139.2013.780967; The reflexive relation between students’ mathematics-related beliefs and the mathematics classroom culture (with P. Op ‘t Eynde, F. Depaepe, and L. Verschaffel) in Personal epistemology in the classroom: Theory, research, and implications for practice (edited by L.D. Bendixen & F.C. Feucht, 2010, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press); Historical developments in the understanding of learning in The nature of learning. Using research to inspire practice (edited by H. Dumont, D. Istance & F. Benavides, 2010, Paris, OECD Publishing). At the 25th International Congress of Applied Psychology in 2002 De Corte was presented with the Award for Outstanding Career Contribution to Educational Psychology, and respectively in 2000 and 2003 he received the degree of Doctor Honoris Causa at the University of Johannesburg and the University of the Free State, Bloemfontein in South Africa. In 2005-2006 he was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. http://perswww.kuleuven.be/~u0004455/

A. H. Halsey is an emeritus professor of sociology at Nuffield College and emeritus director of the Department of Social and Administrative Studies at the University of Oxford. He received his PhD from the University of London. His publications include Origins and Destinations, Change in British Society, Heredity and Environment, Decline of Donnish Dominion, Twentieth-Century British Social Trends, No Discouragement: An Autobiography,and A History of Sociology in Britain: Science, Literature and Society. He is a fellow of the British Academy.

John F. C. Harrison is emeritus professor of history at the University of Sussex. He was formerly deputy director of adult education at the University of Leeds and then professor of history at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He has a BA and MA from Cambridge University and a PhD from Leeds University. He has received the Walter D. Love Memorial Prize of the Conference on British Studies and the Fulbright Award for Research and Teaching. His publications include Learning and Living, Quest for the New Moral World, The Second Coming: Popular Millenarianism, Early Victorian Britain, Late Victorian Britain, The Common People, and Scholarship Boy.